VANITY FEA: Blog de notas de José Angel García Landa (Biescas y Zaragoza) - Octubre de 2014

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    Mi web    Indice    Fotoblog    Videoblog    Lecturas    Enlaces y blogs    Bibliografía  — Música que viene: Pumping Iron (Starlight Express) - Y vuelve: Most Likely You'll Go Your Own Way And I'll Go Mine (Bob Dylan) - Y vuelve: Les clés du paradis (Jane Birkin)
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Viernes 31 de octubre de 2014

Lo que era noticia hoy






—oOo—


Blog de hoy AQUÍ

See the Sea 2

See the Sea 2


—oOo—






Seguimos en la Cima de la Cima

Un día caeremos a la Sima de la Sima, pero de momento estamos, según los índices objetivables, en la cima de la cima.

La red social ACADEMIA, "el Facebook de los universitarios", tiene más de once millones de usuarios. Desde hace más de un mes estoy (según el ránking automático de esta red) en su sector superior, o sea, en el 1 por mil de entre los usuarios más visitados.  Tengo  este mes 3.788 visionados de documentos, y 2.709 visitantes distintos. Seguidores y consultas totales figuran en la imagen abajo. ¿Entro en más detalles sobre quién está en ese uno por mil, y quién no? Mejor no.

Deben ser éstos mis 15 minutos de popularidad, si esto cuenta como popularidad. Si no cuenta, al menos son más de 15 minutos, y de 15 días. Quede este pantallazo para acreditarlo, y la copita de píxeles como merecido premio a mi carrera.


academia 2014

Toma, Melpómene,
para ti la gloria ganada por mis méritos,
que yo sólo quiero que ciñas de buen grado
mi cabellera con laurel Délfico.




¡En el Top 0,1 %!




—oOo—




Jueves 30 de octubre de 2014



Bea en Lapamán, 4


Bea en Lapamán, 4

—oOo—


OTHELLO

—From The Oxford Companion to English Literature, ed. Margaret Drabble.

Othello,  the Moor of Venice, a tragedy by *Shakespeare, written between 1602 and 1604 when it was performed before James I at Whitehall. It was first printed in quarto in 1622, and again in a different version in the *Folio of 1623. The story is taken from *Cinthio, which Shakespeare could have read in Italian or French.

The play's first act (which *Verdi's opera Otello omits) is set in Venice. Desdemona, the daughter of Brabantio, a Venetian senator, has secretly married Othello, a Moor in the service of the state. Accused before the duke and senators of having stolen Brabantio's daughter, Othello explains and justifies his conduct, and is asked by the Senate to lead the Venetian forces against the Turks who are about to attack Cyprus.

In the middle of a storm which disperses the Turkish fleet, Othello lands in Cyprus with Desdemona, Cassio, a young Florentine, who helped him court his wife and whom he has now promoted to be his lieutenant, and Iago, an older soldier, bitterly resentful of being passed over for promotion, who now plans his revenge. Iago uses Roderigo, 'a gull'd Gentleman' in love with Desdemona, to fight with Cassio after he has got him drunk, so that Othello deprives him of his new rank. He then persuades Cassio to ask Desdemona to plead in his favour with Othello, which she warmly does. At the same time he suggests to Othello that Cassio is, and has been, Desdemona's lover, finally, arranging through his wife Emilia, who is Desdemona's waiting-woman, that Othello should see Cassio in possession of a handkerchief which he had given to his bride. Othello is taken in by Iago's promptings and in frenzied jealousy smothers Desdemona in her bed. Iago sets Roderigo to murder Cassio, but when Roderigo fails to to this Iago kills him and Emilia as well, after she has proved Desdemona's innocence to Othello. Emilia's evidence and letters found on Roderigo prove Iago's guilt; he is arrested, and Othello, having tried to stab him, kills himself.

According to *Rymer one of the play's morals was 'a warning to all good wives that they look well to their linen'. *Coleridge in a famous phrase described Iago's soliloquy at the end of I. iii as 'the motive-hunting of motiveless malignity'.


Otelo siempre en Alepo




Revenge Tragedy


From The Oxford Companion to English Literature:

revenge tragedy, a dramatic genre that flourished in the late Elizabethan and Jacobean period, sometimes known as 'the tragedy of blood'. Kyd's *The Spanish Tragedy (c. 1587), a much-quoted prototype, helped to establish a demand for this popular form; later examples are Marlowe's *The Jew of Malta, Shakespeare's *Titus Andronicus, *The Revenger's Tragedy, and, most notably, *Hamlet; there are also strong revenge elements in *Webster. Common ingredients include the hero's quest for vengeance, often at the prompting of the ghost of a murdered kinsman or loved one; scenes of real or feigned insanity; a play-within-a-play; scenes in graveyards, severed limbs, scenes of carnage and mutilation, etc. Many of these items were inherited from Senecan drama, with the difference that in revenge tragedy violence was not reported but took place on stage: as Vendice in The Revenger's Tragedy rather baldly puts it, while in the process of slowly murdering the duke, 'when the bad bleeds, then is the tragedy good.' The revenge code also produced counter-attacks, as in *The Atheist's Tragedy, in Chapman's *The Revenge of Bussy d'Ambois, and again in Hamlet, in which the heroes refuse or hesitate to follow the convention.

The Revenge of Bussy d'Ambois, a tragedy by G. *Chapman, written 1610/11, printed 1613, a sequel to *Bussy D'Ambois.
     Clermont D'Ambois, brother of Bussy, described by his close friend the duc de Guise as the ideal 'Senecal [i.e. stoical] man', gentle, noble, generous, and 'fix'd in himself', is urged by his brother's ghost to avenge his murder, but will only do so by the honourable method of a duel. He sends a challenge to Muntsurry, who reads it; urged again by the ghost, he introduces himself to Montsurry's house, forces him to fight, and kills him. He then learns of the assassination of the Guise, and, refusing to live amid 'all the horrors of the vicious time' as 'the slave of power', he kills himself. The hero's reluctance to exact revenge recalls certain aspects of *Hamlet (See also REVENGE TRAGEDY.)

The Revenger's Tragedy, a tragedy published anonymously in 1607, and from 1656 ascribed to *Tourneur; its authorship has been disputed since 1891, with some scholars defending the traditional attribution and others championing the rival claims of *Middleton and others.
     The central character is Vendice (or Vindice), intent on revenging the death of his mistress, poisoned by the lecherous old duke. The court is a centre of vice and intrigue; the duchess's youngest son is convicted of rape, she herself seduces Spurio, the duke's bastard, and her two older sons, the duke's stepsons, plot against each other and against Lussurioso, the duke's heir. Vendice, disguised as Plato, appears to attempt to procure his own sister Castiza for Lussurioso; she resists, but their mother Gratiana temporarily succumbs to his bribes and agrees to play the bawd. Vendice murders the duke by tricking him into kissing the poisoned skull of his mistress, and most of the remaining characters kill one another or are killed in a final masque of revengers and murderers; Vendice, who survives the bloodbath, owns up to the murder of the duke, and is promptly condemned to death with his brother and accomplice Hippolite by the duke's successor, old Antonio. He is led off to execution, content to 'die after a nest of dukes'. The play is marked by a tragic intensity of feeling, a powerfully satiric wit, and passages of great poetic richness, all combined, for example, in Vendice's address to 'the bony lady', his dead mistress: 'Does the silkworm expend her yellow labours / For thee?' (III. v. 71 ff.) (See also REVENGE TRAGEDY.)

The Duke of Milan, a tragedy by *Massinger, printed 1623, one of his earliest independent plays and a popular one. It is based on the story of Herod and Mariamne as told by Josephus.
     Lodovico Sforza, duke of Milan, has, in the war between the Emperor Charles and the King of France, allied himself with the latter. On their defeat, he goes to surrender himself to Charles, but, fearing for his life, leaves a written instruction with his wicked favourite Francisco to put his beloved wife Marcella to death if he himself is killed. Francisco, seeking to corrupt Marcella in revenge for the dishonoring of his own sister Eugenia by Sforza, reveals the existence of the warrant to her, but fails to move her chastity and only incenses her against the duke, so that on his return after a reconciliation with Charles she receives him coldly. This, coupled with accusations from various quarters of his wife's intmacy with Francisco, makes the duke suspicious of her. Francisco now tells Sforza that Marcella made amorous advances to him, which so inflames the duke with anger that he stabs her to death; dying, she reveals the truth, leaving her husband distracted with remorse. Francisco flees, then returns to court diguised as a Jewish doctor and undertakes to restore Marcella to life. He is discovered and tortured, but not before he succeeds in poisoning the duke.



The Tragic Law


—oOo—




Saliendo del mar


Saliendo del mar



—oOo—



Miércoles 29 de octubre de 2014

El régimen de PPrisa, Cebríán y Rajoy


Y Federico dándole estopa




—oOo—


En Thélème



una publicación de Narratología evolucionista - Evolutionary Narratology.






—oOo—

La voz interior

Somos citados (a cuenta de Narratology) en esta tesis doctoral sobre Darío Jaramillo, Posmodernidad Discreta:

DLEH_Adam_Faye_Posmodernidad_discreta.pdf by Nellie Carrie Sánchez Ramos

 



—oOo—





Martes 28 de octubre de 2014


Día muy oscuro

Día muy oscuro


—oOo—



God and Mammon: The Wealth of Literary Memory

Del curso sobre Milton en la universidad de Yale:




—oOo—






SAMSON AGONISTES

From The Oxford Companion to English Literature, ed. Margaret Drabble:

Samson Agonistes, a tragedy by *Milton, published 1671, in the same volume as *Paradise Regained. Its composition was traditionally assigned to 1666-70, but W. R. Parker in his biography (1968) argues that it was written much earlier, possibly as early as 1647. A closet drama never intended for the stage, it is modelled on Greek tragedy, and has been frequently compared to Prometheus Bound by *Aeschylus or Oedipus at Colonus by *Sophocles: other critics have claimed that its spirit is more Hebraic (or indeed Christian) than Hellenic. Proedominantly in blank verse, it also contains passages of great metrical freedom and originality, and some rhyme. Samson Agonistes (i.e. Samson the Wrestler, or Champion) deasl with the last phase of the life of the Samson of the Book of Judges when he is a prisoner of the Philistines and blind, a phase which many have compared to the assumed circumstances of the blind poet himself, after the collapse of the Commonwealth and his political hopes.

Samson, in prison at Gaza, is visited by friends of his tribe (the chorus) who comfort him; then by his old father Manoa, who holds out hopes of securing his release; then by his wife *Dalila, who seeks pardon and reconciliation, but by being repudiated shows herself 'a manifest Serpent'; then by Harapha, a strong man of Gath, who taunts Samson. He is finally summoned to provide amusement by feats of strength for the Philistines, who are celebrating a feast to *Dagon. He goes, and presently a messenger brings news of his final feat of strength in which he pulled down the pillars of the place where the assembly was gathered, destroying himself as well as the entire throng. The tragedy, which has many passages questioning divine providence ('Just or unjust, alike seem miserable'), ends with the chorus's conclusion that despite human doubts, all is for the best in the 'unsearchable dispose/ Of highest wisdom': its last words, 'calm of mind all passion spent', strike a note of Aristotelian *catharsis, and the whole piece conforms to the *neo-classical doctrine of unities.


Samson Agonistes (Yale Courses)
 


Regalo


Regalo

—oOo—







Pink Tones - Comfortably Numb





—oOo—









Lunes 27 de octubre de 2014

Bibliografía sobre espacio y literatura


Space.&literature.doc by Veronica Bernabei




—oOo—



Capturar el movimiento






—oOo—







Domingo 26 de octubre de 2014

Podemos

Aún no ha terminado octubre, y ya nos piden a los investigadores la memoria de nuestras actividades del año en curso. Ahora me autodenomino investigador porque así me consideran desde que estoy asociado a un grupo subvencionado—que si no ni eres investigador ni una puta mierda, aunque publiques exactamente lo mismo. En mi caso el grupo trabaja sobre hermenéutica y antropología fenomenológica, siendo mi línea la teoría narrativa.

Que a lo que voy, aquí va mi memoria parcial de este año; ya me dirán que incluyo bastantes cosas irrelevantes, pero ni se imaginan lo que sería la lista si incluyo además de esto mis entradas de blog y demás. Así que hay que podar—podemos, como diría Pablo Iglesias. Y una vez podada queda así la lista de mis afanes:




Memoria de actividades de investigación de José Angel García Landa 2014:



1) Coedición de libro:


Tataru, Ludmila, y José Angel García Landa, eds. СЕМИОСФЕРА НАРРАТОЛОГИИ: ДИАЛОГ ЯЗЫКОВ И КУЛЬТУР / Semiosphere of Narratology: A Dialogue of Languages and Cultures. Balashov: Nikolayev / Balashov Institute, Saratov State University, 2013. (Fechado en 2013, salido en 2014)



2) Ponencia:


José Angel García Landa. "La evolución del dividuo social y de los espacios públicos." Conferencia en el seminario HERAF, Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Zaragoza, 10 enero 2014.
_____. "La evolución del dividuo social y de los espacios públicos (The Evolution of the Social Dividual and of Public Spaces)." Preprint en Social Science Research Network 12 enero 2014.*
http://sssrn.com/abstract=2377963
2014 
Ha aparecido también en varias revistas de temáticas de la Social Science Research Network, entre ellas:
Psychological Anthropology eJournal 12 enero 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/Psychological-Anthropology.html
2014
Cross-Cultural Studies eJournal 12 enero 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/Cross-Cultural-Studies.html
 2014
Cultural Anthropology eJournal 12 enero 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/Cultural-Anthropology.html
2014
Revisada como capítulo de libro.



3) Capítulo de libro:


José Angel García Landa. "4. El dividuo social: roles, marcos interaccionales y (nuevos) medios." In Individuo y espacio público. Ed. Juan Velázquez.  Berlín: Logos Verlag, 2014. 99-116.*


4) Artículos:


José Angel García Landa "La frase que lanzó mil barcos al mar (The Phrase that Launched a Thousand Ships)." Social Science Research Network 26 April 2014.*
http://papers.ssrn.com/abstract=2428973
2014
Cognition & the Arts eJournal 6.10 (13 May 2014).*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/Cognition-Arts.html (26 April 2014)
English & Commonwealth Literature eJournal 4.9 (16 May 2014).*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/English-Commonwealth-Lit.html (26 April 2014).*
2014

José Angel García Landa. "Notas sobre reflexividad y retroprospección en La Fenomenología del Espíritu." Social Science Research Network 9 mayo 2014.*
http://papers.ssrn.com/abstract=2434232
2014
Aparecido en varias revistas temáticas de la SSRN:
Cultural Anthropology eJournal 9 mayo 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/Cultural-Anthropology.html
2014
Linguistic Anthropology eJournal 9 mayo 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/Linguistic-Anthropology.html
2014
Psychological Anthropology eJournal 9 mayo 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/Psychological-Anthropology.html
2014
Cognition & Culture… eJournal 22 mayo 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/Cognition-Culture.html (9 mayo 2014)
2014
History of Western Philosophy eJournal 7.16 (20 mayo 2014)
http://www.ssrn.com/link/History-of-Western-Philosophy.html (9 mayo 2014).*
Philosophy of Mind eJournal 26 mayo 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/Philosophy-Mind.html (9 mayo 2014)
2014
Continental Philosophy eJournal 26 May 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/Continental-Philosophy.html (9 mayo 2014)
2014

José Angel García Landa. "Miserias de la guerra de Pío Baroja: Una desilusión con el mundo y con España." Social Science Research Network 6 junio 2014.*
http://papers.ssrn.com/abstract=2446804
2014
Aparecido en varias revistas temáticas electrónicas de la SSRN:
Conflict Studies: Intra-State Conflict eJournal 23 junio 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/Conflict-Studies-Intra-State-Conflict.html (6 junio 2014)
2014
Conflict Studies: Effects of Conflict eJournal 11 junio 2014
http://www.ssrn.com/link/Conflict-Studies-Effects-Conflict.html (6 junio 2014)
2014
Social and Political Conflict eJournal 6 junio 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/Social-Political-Philosophy.html
2014
_____. "Miserias de la guerra de Pío Baroja: Una desilusión con el mundo y con España." Academia 4 junio 2014.*
https://www.academia.edu/7253162/
2014
_____. "Miserias de la guerra de Pío Baroja: Una desilusión con el mundo y con España." ResearchGate 4 junio 2014.*
https://www.researchgate.net/publication/262829095
2014

José Angel García Landa. "Too True to Be Good: Cartografía narrativa." Social Science Research Network 30 abril 2014.*
http://papers.ssrn.com/abstract=2430221
2014
Linguistic Anthropology eJournal 30 April 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/Linguistic-Anthropology.html
2014
Applied and Practicing Anthropology eJournal 30 abril 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/Applied-Practicing-Anthropology.html
2014
Cognition & the Arts eJournal 6.11 (15 May 2014).*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/Cognition-Arts.html  (30 abril 2014).*
2014
English & Commonwealth Literature eJournal 4.9 (16 mayo 2014).*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/English-Commonwealth-Lit.html (30 abril 2014).*
2014
Philosophy of Languge eJournal (20 mayo 2014).*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/Philosophy-Language.html (30 abril  2014).*
2014

José Angel García Landa. "Notes on The Order of Discourse." Social Science Research Network 23 mayo 2013.*
https://www.researchgate.net/publication/262797270
2014
Cultural Anthropology eJournal 23 mayo 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/Cultural-Anthropology.html
2014
Political Anthropology eJournal 23 mayo 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/Political-Anthropology.html
2014
Political Theory: History of Political Thought eJournal 7.19 (27 mayo 2014).*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/PT-History-Political-Thought.html (23 mayo 2014).*
2014
History of Western Philosophy eJournal 7.17 (27 mayo 2014).*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/History-of-Western-Philosophy.html (23 mayo 2014).*
2014
Continental Philosophy eJournal 7.14 (26 mayo 2014).*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/Continental-Philosophy.html (23 mayo 2014).*
2014

José Angel García Landa. "Polibio y el tiempo geológico (Polybius and Geological Time)." Social Science Research Network 2 junio 2014.*
http://papers.ssrn.com/abstract=2442688
2014
Biological Anthropology eJournal 28 mayo 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/Biological-Anthropology.html
2014
Classics Research Network 28 mayo 2014.
http://www.ssrn.com/link/CRN.html
2014
Ancient Philosophical & Scientific Texts eJournal 28 mayo 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/Ancient-Philosophical-Scientific-Texts.html
2014
History of Western Philosophy eJournal 3 mayo 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/History-of-Western-Philosophy.html (28 mayo 2014).*
2014
Philosophy of Science eJournal 9 Junio 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/Philosophy-Science.html (28 mayo 2014).*
2014

José Angel García Landa. "El Big Bang antes del Big Bang—en Spencer, Darwin, y Poe (The Big Bang before the Big Bang—in Spencer, Darwin, and Poe)." Social Science Research Network 10 July 2014.*
http://papers.ssrn.com/abstract=2463993
2014
Cultural Anthropology eJournal 10 July 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/Cultural-Anthropology.html
2014
English & Commonwealth Literature eJournal 10 July 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/English-Commonwealth-Lit.html
2014
Philosophy of Science eJournal 10 July 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/Philosophy-Science.html
2014

García Landa. "The Story behind any Story: The Paris Lecture." Social Science Research Network 31 julio 2014.*
http://ssrn.com/abstract=2474591
2014
Linguistic Anthropology eJournal 2 agosto 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/Linguistic-Anthropology.html
2014
Cultural Anthropology eJournal 2 agosto 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/Cultural-Anthropology.html
2014
Cognition & Culture (…) eJournal 2 agosto 2014.*
 http://www.ssrn.com/link/Cognition-Culture.html
 2014
Human Cognition in Evolution & Deveopment eJournal 2 agosto 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/Human-Cognition-Evolution-Development.html
2014
Cognition in Mathematics, Science & Technology eJournal 2 agosto 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/Cognition-Math-Science-Tech.html
2014
Cognitive Social Science eJournal 2 agosto 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/Cognitive-Social-Science.html
2014
Cognition & the Arts eJournal 2 agosto 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/Cognition-Arts.html
2014
Philosophy of Science eJournal 2 agosto 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/Philosophy-Science.html
2014



5) Libros (reaparecidos)


José Angel García Landa. Aspectos de la técnica narrativa en Hard Times de Charles Dickens (Aspects of Narrative Technique in Charles Dickens's Hard Times)). Online at Social Science Research Networks 28 Feb. 2014.*
http://papers.ssrn.com/abstract=2401586
2014
Aceptado en dos revistas electrónicas temáticas:
Cognition & the Arts eJournal 28 Feb. 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/Cognition-Arts.html
2014
English & Commonwealth Literature eJournal 28 Feb. 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/English-Commonwealth-Lit.html
2014

José Angel García Landa. Reading 'The Monster': The Interpretation of Authorial Intention in the Criticism of Narrative Fiction. PDF en red en Social Science Research Network 22 marzo 2014.*
http://ssrn.com/abstract=2412440
2014
Aceptado en las siguientes revistas electrónicas temáticas:
Cognition & Culture … eJournal 22 marzo 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/Cognition-Culture.html
2014
Cognition & the Arts eJournal 22 marzo 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/Cognition-Arts.html
2014
American Literature eJournal 22 marzo 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/English-American-Literature.html
 2014
Literary Theory & Criticism eJournal 22 marzo 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/English-Lit-Theory-Criticism.html
2014

Acción, Relato, Discurso: Estructura de la ficción narrativa (Action, Story, Discourse: The Structure of Narrative Fiction). Online preprint at Social Science Research Network 14 Aug. 2014.*
http://papers.ssrn.com/abstract=2480262
2014
Linguistic Anthropology eJournal 14 Aug. 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/Linguistic-Anthropology.html
2014
Cognitive Linguistics: Cognition, Language, Gesture eJournal 14 Aug. 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/Cognitive-Linguistics.html
2014
Cognition & the Arts eJournal 14 Aug. 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/Cognition-Arts.html
2014
Rhetorical Theory eJournal 14 Aug. 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/Rhetorical-Theory.html
2014


6) Artículos (reaparecidos)

José Angel García Landa.  "Literary Theory: Introduction and Greek Origins." 1989. Online at Social Science Research Network 4 April 2014.*
http://ssrn.com/abstract=2419920
2014
Linguistic Anthropology eJournal 4 April 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/Linguistic-Anthropology.html
2014
Political Theory: History of Political Thought eJournal 4 April 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/PT-History-Political-Thought.html
2014
Ancient Greek & Roman Literature eJournal 4 April 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/Ancient-Greek-Roman-Literature.html
2014
Literary Theory & Criticism eJournal 4 April 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/English-Lit-Theory-Criticism.html
2014

José Angel García Landa. "Plato's Poetics." Online PDF at Social Science Research Network 26 March 2014.*
http://ssrn.com/abstract=2414535
2014
Cultural Anthropology eJournal 26 March 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/Cultural-Anthropology.html
2014
Ancient Philosophical and Scientific Texts eJournal 26 March 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/Ancient-Philosophical-Scientific-Texts.html
Literary Theory & Criticism eJournal 26 March 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/English-Lit-Theory-Criticism.html
2014
History of Western Philosophy eJournal 26 March 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/History-of-Western-Philosophy.html
2014

José Angel García Landa. "Medieval Criticism: Poetics, Aesthetics and Hermeneutics." Online at Social Science Research Network 30 March 2014.*
http://papers.ssrn.com/abstract=2417263
2014
Anthropology of Religion eJournal 30 March 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/Anthropology-Religion.html
2014
Linguistic Anthropology eJournal 30 March 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/Linguistic-Anthropology.html
2014
Literary Theory & Criticism eJournal 30 March 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/English-Lit-Theory-Criticism.html
2014
History of Western Philosophy eJournal 30 March 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/History-of-Western-Philosophy.html
2014
Philosophy of Religion eJournal 30 March 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/Philosophy-Religion.html
2014
Religious Studies Research Network 30 March 2014.*
http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/JELJOUR_Results.cfm?form_name=journalBrowse&journal_id=948093
2014

José Angel García Landa. "Notes on Metafiction." Social Science Research Network 16 April 2014.*
http://ssrn.com/abstract=2425095
2014
Literary Theory & Criticism eJournal 16 April 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/English-Lit-Theory-Criticism.html
2014

José Angel García Landa. "Narrative and Identity." En red en Social Science Research Network 15 enero 2014.*
http://ssrn.com/abstract=2378357
2014
Human cognition in Evolution & Development eJournal 15 enero 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/Human-Cognition-Evolution-Development.html
2014
Cognitive Linguistics: Cognition, Language, Gesture eJournal 15 enero 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/Cognitive-Linguistics.html
2014
Cognition & the Arts eJournal 15 enero 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/Cognition-Arts.html
2014
Aesthetics & Philosophy of Art eJournal 15 enero 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/Aesthetics-Philosophy-Art.html
2014
Philosophy of Mind eJournal 15 enero 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/Philosophy-Mind.html
2014
Rhetorical Theory eJournal 15 enero 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/Rhetorical-Theory.html
2014

José Ángel García Landa. "Illuminations from This Thing of Darkness." The Evolutionary Review 1 (2010): 138-40.*
_____. "Illuminations from This Thing of Darkness." Social Science Research Network 5 feb. 2014.*
http://ssrn.com/abstract=2390119
2014
Cultural Anthropology eJournal 5 Feb. 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/Cultural-Anthropology.html
2014
Biological Anthropology eJournal 5 Feb. 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/Biological-Anthropology.html
2014
English and Commonwealth Literature eJournal 5 Feb. 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/English-Commonwealth-Lit.html
2014

Pier, John, y José Ángel García Landa, eds. "Introduction to Theorizing Narrativity." Social Science Research Network 26 Sept. 2014.*
http://papers.ssrn.com/abstract=2500699
2014
Cognition & the Arts eJournal 26 Sept. 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/Cognition-Arts.html
2014
Cognition & Culture (…) eJournal 26 Sept. 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/Cognition-Culture.html
2014
Literary Theory & Criticism eJournal 26 Sept. 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/English-Lit-Theory-Criticism.html
2014
Aesthetics & Philosophy of Art eJournal 26 Sept. 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/Aesthetics-Philosophy-Art.html
2014
Philosophy of Language eJournal 26 Sept. 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/Philosophy-Language.html
2014



7) Notas en IBERCAMPUS


José Angel García Landa. "El Gran Viaje en El Último Mohicano." Ibercampus (Vanity Fea) 3 enero 2014.*
http://www.ibercampus.info/el-gran-viaje-en-el-ultimo-mohicano-26517.htm
2013
_____. "Los marcos como espacios públicos." Ibercampus (Vanity Fea) 12 enero 2014.*
http://www.ibercampus.info/los-marcos-como-espacios-publicos-26572.htm
2014
_____. "Repair Work in Autobiography." Ibercampus (Vanity Fea) 26 feb. 2014.*
http://www.ibercampus.eu/repair-work-in-autobiography-1552.htm
2014
_____. "The Fleeting Systems Lapse Like Foam." Ibercampus (Vanity Fea) 23 feb. 2014.*
http://www.ibercampus.info/the-fleeting-systems-lapse-like-foam-26936.htm
2014
_____. "El Lobo de Wall Street, aquí." Ibercampus (Vanity Fea) 1 marzo 2014.*
http://www.ibercampus.info/el-lobo-de-wall-street-aqui-26993.htm
2014
_____. "Veblen y la teatralidad." Ibercampus (Vanity Fea) 20 marzo 2014.*
http://www.ibercampus.es/veblen-y-la-teatralidad-27158.htm
2014
_____. "La estructura pragmática de la narración literaria." Ibercampus (Vanity Fea) 26 marzo 2014.*
http://www.ibercampus.es/la-estructura-pragmatica-de-la-narracion-literaria-27208.htm
2014
_____. "Narratología evolucionista." Ibercampus (Vanity Fea) 28 March 2014.*
http://www.ibercampus.es/narratologia-evolucionista-27235.htm
2014
_____. "Primeros Principios, Resumen y Conclusión." Ibercampus (Vanity Fea) 12 abril 2014.*
http://www.ibercampus.info/primeros-principios-resumen-y-conclusion-27355.htm
2014
_____. "Marx y la naturaleza humana." Ibercampus (Vanity Fea) 21 abril 2014.*
http://www.ibercampus.info/marx-y-la-naturaleza-humana-27410.htm
2014
_____. "Estromas, marcos, y virtualidad de lo real." Ibercampus (Vanity Fea) 25 May 2014.*
         http://www.ibercampus.es/estromas-marcos-y-virtualidad-de-lo-real-27671.htm
         2014
_____. "La perspectiva dominante en El arte de la guerra." In García Landa, Vanity Fea 2 mayo 2014.*
http://www.ibercampus.info/la-perspectiva-dominante-en-el-arte-de-la-guerra-27492.htm
2014
_____. "Ignorando la mortalidad." Ibercampus (Vanity Fea) 31 mayo 2014.*
http://www.ibercampus.info/ignorando-la-mortalidad-27726.htm
2014
_____. "Retroprospección del Dasein." Ibercampus (Vanity Fea) 5 junio 2014.*
http://www.ibercampus.info/retroprospeccion-del-dasein-27770.htm
2014
_____. "Respetar los derechos de las comunidades autónomas." Ibercampus (Vanity Fea) 19 junio 2014.*
http://www.ibercampus.es/respetar-los-derechos-de-las-comunidades-autonomas-27874.htm
2014
_____. "Las mentes irreverentes." Ibercampus (Vanity Fea) 10 julio 2014.*
http://www.ibercampus.info/articulo.asp?idarticulo=28055
2014
_____. "Teoría de la desilusión." Ibercampus (Vanity Fea) 21 julio 2014.*
http://www.ibercampus.info/teoria-de-la-desilusion-28126.htm
2014
_____. "Descubrir la desilusión: es una verdad." La Onda Digital 683 (2014). (= "Teoría de la desilusión").
http://www.laondadigital.uy/archivos/2430
2014
_____. "Interaction as Reality-Maintenance." Ibercampus (Vanity Fea) 29 julio 2014.*
http://www.ibercampus.eu/interaction-as-realitymaintenance-2140.htm
2014
_____. "The Story behind any Story: The Paris Lecture." Ibercampus (Vanity Fea) 31 julio 2014.*
http://www.ibercampus.eu/the-story-behind-any-story-2149.htm
2014
_____. "Conversión, Reinterpretación, Topsight y Retroacción." Ibercampus (Vanity Fea) 3 agosto 2014.*
http://www.ibercampus.info/conversion-reinterpretacion-topsight-y-retroaccion-28238.htm
2014
_____. "Narratividad del fotoblog." Ibercampus (Vanity Fea) 16 agosto 2014.*
         http://www.ibercampus.info/narratividad-del-fotoblog-28332.htm
         2014

_____. "El derecho a ofenderse." Ibercampus (Vanity Fea) 1 Sept. 2014.*
http://www.ibercampus.info/el-derecho-a-ofenderse-28433.htm
2014
_____. "Glass Prospective: La televisión medieval en el teatro isabelino." Ibercampus 6 Sept. 2014.*
http://www.ibercampus.info/la-television-medieval-en-el-teatro-isabelino-28484.htm
2014
_____. "Las torpezas y falacias de la independencia escocesa." Ibercampus (Vanity Fea) 10 Sept. 2014.*
http://www.ibercampus.info/las-torpezas-y-falacias-de-la-independencia-escocesa-28522_16.htm
2014



8) Blogs


Narratología evolucionista / Evolutionary Narratology. Facebook group.
https://www.facebook.com/narratologiaevolucionista
2014

Retrospection: Perspectives on Narrative Theory, Hindsight, Hindsight Bias, and the Dynamics of Narrativity. Blog.
http://www.scoop.it/t/retrospection
2012

The Story in All Stories: Items on Cosmology, Evolution, (Big) History and Representation. Blog at Storify.*
http://storify.com/JoseAngel/the-story-in-all-stories
http://sfy.co/fZ3
2012

El Gran Teatro del Mundo y el pequeño teatro de la mente
https://storify.com/JoseAngel/el-gran-teatro-del-mundo
2014

—además de las secciones de diversos blogs misceláneos y personales, por ej.:

Narratología (Vanity Fea)
http://vanityfea.blogspot.com.es/search/label/Narratolog%C3%ADa
2014


9) Bibliografías

José Angel García Landa. A Bibliography of Literary Theory, Criticism and Philology, 19ª ed. (2014)
http://bit.ly/abiblio
2014

José Angel García Landa. "Experimental Fiction." De A Bibliography of Literary Theory, Criticism and Philology. En red en Scribd (Dante Simer) 10 enero 2014.*
http://es.scribd.com/doc/198472723/Experimental-fiction
2014

José Angel García Landa. "Realism." De A Bibliography of Literary Theory, Criticism and Philology. En red en Scribd (marcoslopes) 10 enero 2014.*
https://es.scribd.com/doc/198495804/Realism
2014

José Angel García Landa. "Intertextuality – General." De A Bibliography of Literary Theory, Criticism and Philology. En red en Scribd (horagabomilo) 26 enero 2014.*
http://es.scribd.com/doc/231458707/1-Intertextuality-general
201

José Angel García Landa. "Spanish literary history." From A Bibliography of Literary Theory, Criticism and Philology. Online at Scribd (241074) 21 Feb. 2014.*
http://es.scribd.com/doc/208447659/1-Spanish-lh     
2014

José Angel García Landa. "Julia Kristeva." De A Bibliography of Literary Theory, Criticism, and Philology. En red en Scribd (stgerr) 23 feb. 2014.*
http://es.scribd.com/doc/208661671/Kristeva-J
2014

José Angel García Landa. "F. R. Leavis." De A Bibliography of Literary Theory, Criticism and Philology. En red en Scribd (Bing-e-Qaiser) 1 marzo 2014.*
http://es.scribd.com/doc/209925561/Leavis-F-R
2014

José Angel García Landa. "English Dictionaries." De A Bibliography of Literary Theory, Criticism and Philology. En red en Koriobook 10 marzo 2014.*
http://www.koriobook.com/read-file/from-a-bibliography-of-literary-theory-criticism-and-philology-doc-1626749/
2014

José Angel García Landa. "Solitude." From A Bibliography of Literary Theory, Criticism and Philology. Online at Koriobook 10 March 2014.*
http://www.koriobook.com/read-file/from-a-bibliography-of-literary-theory-criticism-and-philology-10th-doc-2406747/
2014

José Angel García Landa. "F. D. E. Schleiermacher." De A Bibliography of Literary Theory, Criticism and Philology. En red en Scribd (Diana Berrío) 8 abril 2014.*
http://es.scribd.com/doc/217059513/Schleiermacher-F
2014

José Angel García Landa. "On Psychoanalytic Critism." De A Bibliography of Literary Theory, Criticism and Philology. En red en Scribd (FlorenciaHsu) 14 abril 2014.*
http://es.scribd.com/doc/218047357/Lista-de-Psicoanalisis
2014

José Angel García Landa. "Characters in Drama." De A Bibliography of Literary Theory, Criticism and Philology. En red en Scribd (Ward El Mouna Belarbi) 3 junio 2014.*
http://es.scribd.com/doc/227759940/Characters-drama
2014

José Angel García Landa. "Tom Stoppard." De A Bibliography of Literary Theory, Criticism and Philology. En red en Scribd (Ward El Mouna Belarbi) 3 junio 2014.*
http://es.scribd.com/doc/227759490/Stoppard-T
2014

José Angel García Landa. "General Bibliographies of Literature, Criticism and Theory." De A Bibliography of Literary Theory, Criticism and Philology. En red en UchebaNa5.*
http://uchebana5.ru/cont/3790143.html
2014

José Angel García Landa. "Research Methodology." De A Bibliography of Literary Theory, Criticism, and Philology. Google Scholar
http://scholar.google.com/citations?view_op=view_citation&citation_for_view=yyqrci8AAAAJ:oldoQiaHq2UC
2014



10) Traducciones


García Landa, José Angel. trad. "Lee Smolin habla sobre El Renacer del Tiempo." Social Science Research Network 26 marzo 2014.*
http://ssrn.com/abstract=2414726
2014
Cultural Anthropology eJournal 26 marzo 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/Cultural-Anthropology.html
2014
History of Western Philosophy eJournal 7.12 (1 abril 2014).*
http://hq.ssrn.com/Journals/IssueProof.cfm?abstractid=2414726&journalid=950374&issue_number=12&volume=7&journal_type=CMBO&function=showissue
http://www.ssrn.com/link/History-of-Western-Philosophy.html (26 March 2014)
Metaphysics eJournal 7.9 (2 abril 2014).*
http://hq.ssrn.com/Journals/IssueProof.cfm?abstractid=2414726&journalid=950386&issue_number=9&volume=7&journal_type=CMBO&function=showissue
http://www.ssrn.com/link/Metaphysics.html (26 abril 2014)
2014




—oOo—






Old World Language Families


indoeuropean


Observen la pobre y escuálida rama céltica, en qué ha quedado.


—oOo—



El status narrativo en la Trilogía


Un capítulo de mi libro de 1992, "El status narrativo en la Trilogía" (Samuel Beckett y la narración reflexiva, 3) (Narrative Status in the Trilogy (Samuel Beckett and Reflexive Narrative, 3))

http://papers.ssrn.com/abstract=2507744 

Reference Info: Samuel Beckett y la narración reflexiva (Zaragoza: Prensas Universitarias de Zaragoza, 1992)

To be found now in two of the SSRN e-journals (Date posted: October 10, 2014)


eJournal Classifications
CSN Subject Matter eJournals
    
Cognition & the Arts eJournal - CMBO
        
CSN: Mental Operations (Cognition & the Arts) (Topic) - CMBO
            
CSN: Narrative & Story (Sub-Topic) - CMBO
LIT Subject Matter eJournals
    
English & Commonwealth Literature eJournal - CMBO
        
LIT: Other English & Commonwealth Literature (Topic) - CMBO




—oOo—





Vera Lynn (2)





—oOo—


Childhood's End






Obscured by Clouds full album



—oOo—





Costa da Vela desde el Facho



Costa da Vela desde el Facho





—oOo—








Sábado 25 de octubre de 2014


An Introduction to Greek Drama






An Introduction to Greek Tragedy

—oOo—





Лингвистика


También en la lejana Macedonia soy una referencia en LINGÜÍSTICA—en el artículo de su Wikipedia:

Лингвистика

Од Википедија — слободната енциклопедија

Estas son las referencias del artículo; con referencias en alfabeto latino y con enlaces externos, incluida mi bibliografía, en cirílico.

Литература

Надворешни врски



Hombre, ya puestos, podrían enlazarme en el Massachusetts Institute of Technology, o en Harvard, además de en la Wikipedia macedónica, pero a nadie le amarga un dulce.





—oOo—









Glorious Light Far Away

Glorious light far away 2

He perdido cientos y cientos de fotos de este verano. Ya me decían que para qué hacía tantas.  Me quedan las miniaturas, y las he subido a Flickr en forma de pantallazo. Alguna la aumento para que dé una triste idea de lo bonitas que eran algunas de las fotos, que ya nadie las verá.  Pero las he visto yo, y tantas cosas he visto que no creeríais, naves ardiendo en la Puerta de Tannhäuser, etc. Todo se perderá, como estas lágrimas. Excepto...
—excepto lo que ya se ha perdido.




—oOo—





Pink Tones play Atom Heart Mother at Segóbriga






—oOo—





Viernes 24 de octubre de 2014

Federico a las 8: Los delitos catalanes y la alta traición de Rajoy





—oOo—








En el English & Commonwealth Literature eJournal


En el English & Commonwealth Literature eJournal



www.ssrn.com/link/English-Commonwealth-Lit.html

Estoy en portada en esta revista del SSRN de mi área, este octubre de 2014, con varios artículos, capítulos de mi libro sobre Samuel Beckett.

—oOo—



Chica voleibol


Chica voleibol



—oOo—




Ben Jonson Bibliography

Ben Jonson (1572-1637)


     (English dramatist and poet, b. Westminster, orphaned son of a Protestant minister, st. Westminster School, left Cambridge without a degree, apprenticed as bricklayer to father-in-law; volonteer in Flanders army 1592, killed enemy in single combat, actor in London c. 1594, imprisoned for manslaughter, converted to Catholicism for some time, married 1594, children died; returned to Anglicanism 1606; pensioned by the King 1616; honorary MA Oxford 1619; poet for aristocratic patrons, apologist of Stuart royalty; neoclassical theorist and literary authority, overweight and hard drinker)




Works




1590s

Jonson, Ben. Every Man in his Humour. Comedy. Acted 1596, rev. version acted at Blackfriars, 1598.
_____. Every Man In His Humour. London: Walter Burre, 1601.
_____. Every Man in His Humour. In Jonson, Works. 1616.
_____. Every Man in his Humour. Ed. Herford and Simpson.
_____. Every Man in His Humour. (Revels series). Ed. Robert S. Miola.
_____. The Case Is Altered. Comedy. 1598. (Vs Munday, "Don Antonio Ballendino").
_____. Prologue to Every Man in his Humour. Folio ed., 1616.
_____. ? The Scottes Tragedy. Drama. 1599. (Lost).
Jonson, Ben, Thomas Dekker, and Henry Chettle. Robert the Second, King of Scottes. Drama.   c. 1599. (Lost).
Chettle, Henry, Henry Porter and Ben Jonson. Hot Anger soon Cold. Drama. August 1598. Not printed.
Nashe, Thomas, Ben Jonson, et al. The Isle of Dogs. Drama. 1597. (Lost).




1600s

Jonson, Ben. Cynthia's Revels. Drama. Acted at Whitehall and Blackfriars, 1600.
_____. Cynthia's Revels. Ed. C. H. Herford and Percy Simpson. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1932.
_____. Every Man Out of His Humour. Comedy. Staged Globe theatre, 1600.
_____. Every Man Out of His Humour. Online at Project Gutenberg.*
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/3695/3695-h/3695-h.htm
2012
_____. Prologue to Every Man Out of His Humour. 1600. Select. in Literary Criticism from Plato to Dryden. Ed. Gilbert. 537-38.
_____. "Queen and Huntress."  Poem. 1600. In The Norton Anthology of English Literature. 7th ed. Ed. M. H. Abrams, Stephen Greenblatt et al. New York: Norton, 1999. 1.1413-14.
_____. "Slow, Slow, Fresh Fount." Poem. 1600.  In The Norton Anthology of English Literature. 7th ed. Ed. M. H. Abrams, Stephen Greenblatt et al. New York: Norton, 1999. 1.1413.*
_____. The Poetaster. Comedy. Acted at Blackfriars, 1601.
_____. Poetaster. Ed Tom Cain. Manchester: Manchester UP, 1995. 1996.
_____. Rev. version of Jeronymo for Henslowe. 1601.
_____. Richard Crook-Back. Tragedy. 1602. (Lost).
_____. Sejanus His Fall. Tragedy (in collaboration with anon. author). Produced by the King's Men, Globe theatre, 1603. Rev. version by Ben Jonson 1605. (Political play, in support of the  Earl of Essex).
_____. "To the Readers of Sejanus." 1605. In Criticism from Plato to Dryden. Ed. Gilbert. 538-49.*
_____. "To the Readers." In Sejanus, His Fall. 1605. In Writing and the English Renaissance. Ed. William Zunder and Suzanne Trill. Harlow (Essex): Longman, 1996. 265-66.*
_____. Panegyric on the First Meeting of Parliament. c. 1604.
_____. The Masque of Blackness. Acted 1605. In The Norton Anthology of English Literature. 7th ed. Ed. M. H. Abrams, Stephen Greenblatt et al. New York: Norton, 1999. 1.1294-1303.*
_____. Hymenaei. Masque. First performed 1606.
_____. Volpone. Comedy. First performed King's Men, Globe Theatre, 1606. Acted 1606 at Oxford and Cambridge.
_____. Volpone. Quarto, 1607.
_____. Volpone. In Works, 1616.
_____. Volpone. Ed. Jonas Barish. Arlington Heights (IL): AHM, 1958.
_____. Volpone or the Fox /Volpone o el zorro. Bilingual ed. Ed. and trans. A. Sarabia Santander. Barcelona: Bosch, 1980.
_____. Volpone. In Jonson,Volpone and Other Plays. Ed. Lorna Hutson. (Renaissance Dramatists). Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1998.
_____. Volpone.  In The Norton Anthology of English Literature. 7th ed. Ed. M. H. Abrams, Stephen Greenblatt et al. New York: Norton, 1999. 1.1303-93.*
_____. Volpone, or the Fox. Online at Project Gutenberg.
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/4039/4039-h/4039-h.htm
2012
_____. Volpone. In English Renaissance Drama: A Norton Anthology. Ed. David Bevington et al. New York and London: Norton, 2002. 673-64.*
_____. Volpone. Ed. and trans. Purificación Ribes. (Letras Universales). Madrid: Cátedra, 2002.
_____. Dedicatory Epistle of Volpone. 1606. In The Personal Note. Ed. H. J. C. Grierson and S. Wason. London: Chatto, 1946. 38-41.
_____. "Dedication to Volpone." In Literary Criticism and Theory. Ed. R. C. Davis and L. Finke. London: Longman, 1989. 234-37.*
_____. The Masque of Whiteness. c. 1607.
_____. Masque of Beauty. 1608.
_____. "Still to Be Neat." Poem. 1609.  In The Norton Anthology of English Literature. 7th ed. Ed. M. H. Abrams, Stephen Greenblatt et al. New York: Norton, 1999. 1.1414.*
_____. Britain's Burse. Drama. 1609.
_____. Speeches at Prince Henry's Barriers. 1609.  (Allegorical tournament-entertainment).
_____. Epicoene: Or, The Silent Woman. Comedy. 1609-10.
_____. Epicene. In English Renaissance Drama: A Norton Anthology. Ed. David Bevington et al. New York and London: Norton, 2002. 775-860.*
_____. The Key Keeper: An Entertainment at Britain's Burse. Masque. 1609. Ed. John Knowles. Forthcoming 1997.
_____. The Entertainment at Britain's Burse. Masque. Written 1609. 1st ed. in Re-Presenting Ben Jonson: Text, Performance, History. Ed. Martin Butler. Houndmills: Macmillan, 1999.
_____. The Masque of Queens. 1609.
Jonson, Ben, John Marston and George Chapman. Eastward Ho! Comedy. 1605.
_____. Eastward Ho! Edited by C. G. Petter.  (The New Mermaids). Benn, 1973.




1610s

_____. Barriers. 1610.
_____. The Alchemist. Comedy. c. 1610.
_____. The Alchemist.  Ed. F. H. Mares. London: Methuen.
_____. The Alchemist. Ed. Peter Bement. London: Routledge, 1987.
_____. The Alchemist. In The Alchemist and Other Plays. Ed. Gordon Campbell. Oxford: Oxford UP, 1995.
_____. The Alchemist. In English Renaissance Drama: A Norton Anthology. Ed. David Bevington et al. New York and London: Norton, 2002. 861-960.*
_____. Preface to The Alchemist. 1612.
_____. Oberon the Fairy Prince. Masque. 1611.
_____. Catiline His Conspiracy. Tragedy. Pub. 1611.
_____. Love Restored. Masque. 1612.
_____. A Challenge at Tilt. Drama. 1613.
_____. "Induction" to Bartholomew Fair. 1614.
_____. "Ben Jonson on The Tempest (and Titus Andronicus) (1614)." In The Norton Shakespeare. Ed. Stephen Greenblatt et al. New York: Norton, 1997. 3341.*
_____. The Devil is an Ass. Drama. 1616.
_____. Lovers Made Men. Masque. 1617.
_____. Bartholomew Fair. Comedy. 1614.
_____. Bartholomew Fair. Ed. Maurice Hussey. London: Benn, 1964.
_____. Bartholomew Fair. In English Renaissance Drama: A Norton Anthology. Ed. David Bevington et al. New York and London: Norton, 2002. 961-1066.*
_____. The Devil's an Ass. Comedy. 1616.
_____. Mercury Vindicated from the Alchemists in Court. Masque. 1616.
_____. The Workes of Beniamin Jonson. Imprinted at London: By Will Stansby, 1616.  (Folio; Contains: Comedies, Tragedies, Masques,  Epigrams, and The Forest poems).
_____. "On My First Son." Poem. In Perrine's Literature: Structure, Sound, and Sense. By Thomas R. Arp and Greg Johnson. 8th ed. Boston (MA): Thomson Learning-Heinle & Heinle, 2002. 764.*
_____. From Epigrams. 1616. ("To My Book", "On Something, That Walks Somewhere," "To William Camden," "On My Fist Daughter," "To John Donne," "On Don Surly," "On Giles and Joan," "On My First Son," "On Lucy, Countess of Bedford," "To Lucy, Countess of Bedford, with Mr. Donne's Satires," "Inviting a Friend to Supper," "Epitaph on S.P., a Child of Queen's Elizabeth Chapel.").  In The Norton Anthology of English Literature. 7th ed. Ed. M. H. Abrams, Stephen Greenblatt et al. New York: Norton, 1999. 1.393-99.*
_____. From The Forest. 1616. ("To Penshurst," "Song: To Celia," "To Heaven").  In The Norton Anthology of English Literature. 7th ed. Ed. M. H. Abrams, Stephen Greenblatt et al. New York: Norton, 1999. 1.1399-1403.*
_____. "Song: To Celia." In Perrine's Literature: Structure, Sound, and Sense. By Thomas R. Arp and Greg Johnson. 8th ed. Boston (MA): Thomson Learning-Heinle & Heinle, 2002. 1064-65.*
_____. Pleasure Reconciled to Virtue. Masque. 1618.
_____. Conversations with Drummond. 1619.
_____, ed. History of the World. By Sir Walter Ralegh. 1614.
Jonson, Ben, and Inigo Jones. Oberon. Masque. 1611.




1620s

Jonson, Ben. Conversations with William Drummond of Hawthornden. In Ben Jonson (The Oxford Authors) 595-612.
_____. The Gipsies Metamorphosed. Masque. 1621.
_____. Time Vindicated. 1623.
_____. "To the Reader." Prefatory poem to the First Folio of Shakespeare's plays. 1623. Facsimile. In The Norton Shakespeare. Ed. Stephen Greenblatt et al. New York: Norton, 1997. 3346.*
_____. "To the Memory of my Beloved, The Author, Mr. William Shakespeare, and What He Hath Left Us." In Mr. William Shakespeares  Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies. (First Folio). London,1623.
_____. "To the memory of my beloued, the avthor Mr. William Shakespeare: And what he hat left vs." Prefatory poem to the First Folio of Shakespeare's plays. 1623. Facsimile. In The Norton Shakespeare. Ed. Stephen Greenblatt et al. New York: Norton, 1997. 3351-52.*
_____. "To the memory of my beloved, the author, Mr. William Shakespeare, and what he hath left us." In The Works of Ben Jonson, vol. 3. London: Chatto & Windus, 1910. 287-9. Luminarium
http://www.luminarium.org/sevenlit/jonson/benshake.htm
2013
_____. "To the Memory of My Beloved, the Author." 1623. In Shakespeare Criticism: A Selection 1623-1840. London: Oxford UP, 1946. 3-5.
_____. "To the Memory of my Beloved, The Author, Mr. William Shakespeare, and What He Hath Left Us."  1623. In The Norton Anthology of English Literature. 7th ed. Ed. M. H. Abrams, Stephen Greenblatt et al. New York: Norton, 1999. 1.1414-16.*
_____. Neptune's Triumph for the Return of Albion. Masque. 1624.
_____. The Fortunate Isles. 1625.
_____. The Staple of Newes. Comedy. 1626.
_____. Anti-Masque of Jophiel. 1627.
_____. "To the Immortal Memory and Friendship of that Noble Pair, Sir Lucius Cary and Sir H. Morison." Ode. 1629, pub. 1640-41.  In The Norton Anthology of English Literature. 7th ed. Ed. M. H. Abrams, Stephen Greenblatt et al. New York: Norton, 1999. 1.1.1609-13.*
Heminge, John, Henry Condell, Ben Jonson, et al. "Front Matter from the First Folio of Shakespeare's Plays (1623)." Facsimiles. In The Norton Shakespeare. Ed. Stephen Greenblatt et al. New York: Norton, 1997. 3345-57.*




1630s

Jonson, Ben. The New Inn. Comedy. 1630. Printed in 1631 octavo; omitted from the 1640 folio. Included in 1692 folio.
_____. "Ode (To Himself)." The Oxford Book of Seventeenth Century Verse. Ed. H. J. C. Grierson and G. Bullough. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1934. 179-180.
_____. "Ode (To Himself)." Luminarium.*
http://www.luminarium.org/sevenlit/jonson/odetohimself2.htm
2011
_____. "Expostulation with Inigo Jones." 1631.
_____. Love's Triumph Through Callipolis. Masque. Acted 1631..
_____. Chloridia. Masque. 1631.
_____. "Ode to Himself." 1631, 1640-41. 
_____. "An Ode to Himself." In The Songs and Poems of Ben Jonson. London: Philip Allan & Co., 1924. 59-60.
_____. "Ode to Himself." In The Norton Anthology of English Literature. 7th ed. Ed. M. H. Abrams, Stephen Greenblatt et al. New York: Norton, 1999. 1.1416-18.*
_____. "An Ode to Himself." Luminarium
http://www.luminarium.org/sevenlit/jonson/odetohimself.htm
2012
_____. The Magnetic Lady. Comedy. 1632.
_____. Tale of a Tub. Drama. 1633.
_____. "Induction" to The Magnetic Lady. 1635.
_____. The Sad Shepherd. Pastoral drama. c. 1637.
_____. The Sad Shepherd: Or, A Tale of Robin Hood. Online facsimile at The Internet Archive
http://archive.org/stream/sadshepherdorat00jonsgoog#page/n14/mode/2up
2012
_____. The Second Book of the English Grammar. c. 1637.
Fletcher, John, George Chapman, Ben Jonson and Philip Massinger (?). Rollo: or the Bloody Brother. Oxford, 1638.




1640s

Jonson, Ben. The English Grammar. Ed. James Howell. 1640.
_____. The English Grammar. In Jonson, Works. 1640.
_____. English Grammar. Rev. ed. in Jonson's 1692 Folio.
_____. The Underwood. In Jonson, (Works, Second folio). 1640.
_____. From Underwood. 1640-41. (From "A Celebration of Charis in Ten Lyric Pieces," "A Sonnet, to the Noble Lady, the Lady Mary Wroth," "My Picture Left in Scotland,").  In The Norton Anthology of English Literature. 7th ed. Ed. M. H. Abrams, Stephen Greenblatt et al. New York: Norton, 1999. 1.1403-9.*
_____. An Execration against Vulcan. 1640.
_____. Works. 2nd ed. 1640.
_____. Timber: Or, Discoveries. Criticism. 1st ed. in Workes. Vol. 2. 1640.
_____. Timber. In 1692 folio.
_____. Discoveries. Ed. Maurice Castelain. Paris, 1906.
_____. Timber: Or, Discoveries. Selection. In The Great Critics. Ed. J. H. Smith and E. W. Parks. New York: Norton, 1932. 212-21.*
_____. Discoveries. Ed. G. B. Harrison. (Bodley Head Quartos).
_____. Timber: Or, Discoveries. Ed. Ralph S. Walker. London: Greenwood Press, 1976.
_____. Timber or discoveries. In Jonson, The Complete Poems. Ed. G. Parfitt. Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1980.
_____. Timber, or, Discoveries. In Ben Jonson (The Oxford Authors) 521-94.*
_____. From Timber, or Discoveries. 1640-41. (Style). In The Norton Anthology of English Literature. 7th ed. Ed. M. H. Abrams, Stephen Greenblatt et al. New York: Norton, 1999. 1.1616-18.*
_____. "De Shakespeare Nostrati." 1641. In Shakespeare Criticism: A Selection 1623-1840. London: Oxford UP, 1946. 6.
_____. "Ben Jonson on Shakespeare (1623-37)." From Timber. In The Norton Shakespeare. Ed. Stephen Greenblatt et al. New York: Norton, 1997. 3360-61.*
_____, trans. The Art of Poetry. By Horace. In Works. Ed. 1640.
_____, trans. The Art of Poetry. By Horace. In The Great Critics. Ed. James Harry Smith and Edd Winfield Parks. New York: Norton, 1932. 88-105.*




Other works

Jonson, Ben.The Masque of Augurs.
_____. Commentary on the Poetics. (Lost).
_____. Journey into Scotland. (Lost).
_____. May Lord. Drama. (Lost).
_____. Life of Henry V. (Unfinished and lost).
_____. Rape of Proserpine. Poem. (Lost).
_____. Epitaph on the Countess of Pembroke.
Jonson, Ben, and Inigo Jones. Love's Triumph Through Callipolis. Masque.





Collected works

Jonson, Ben. Works. 1616. (Folio).
_____. Works. 2nd ed. 1640.
_____. (Works). 1692 (Folio).
_____. (Works of Ben Jonson). Octavo, 6 vols. Illustrated. Jacob Tonson, 1716.
_____. Jonson Anthology (1617-1637). Ed. E. Arber. (British Anthologies 5). Frowde, 1899.
_____. The Works of Ben Jonson. Ed. C. H. Herford, Percy Simpson, and Evelyn Simpson. 11 vols. Oxford: Clarendon, 1925-52. 1971.
_____. The Complete Poetry of Ben Jonson. Ed. W. B. Hunter, Jr. New York: New York UP, 1963.
_____. The Complete Poetry of Ben Jonson. Ed. William B. Hunter, Jr. Garden City (NY): Doubleday-Anchor, 1963.
_____. The Complete Poetry of Ben Jonson. Ed. William B. Hunter, Jr. New York: Norton, 1978.
_____. Ben Jonson. Ed. Thom Gunn. (Poet to Poet). Harmondsworth: Penguin.
_____. Ben Jonson and the Cavalier Poets. Ed. Hugh Maclean. (Norton Critical Edition). New York: Norton, 1975.
_____. Ben Jonson's Plays and Masques. Ed. Robert M. Adams. (Norton Critical Edition). New York: Norton, 1979.
_____. The Complete Poems. Ed. George Parfitt. Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1975. 1980.
_____. Three Comedies (Volpone, The Alchemist, Bartholomew Fair). Harmondsworth: Penguin.*
_____. Five Plays.  Ed. G. A. Wilkes. Oxford: Oxford UP.
_____. Ben Jonson (The Oxford Authors). Ed. Ian Donaldson. Oxford: Oxford UP, 1985.*
_____. "On My First Son." "My Picture left in Scotland." "To Penshurst." From Volpone. In The Arnold Anthology of British and Irish Literature in English. Ed. Robert Clark and Thomas Healy. London: Hodder Headline-Arnold, 1997. 303-15.*
_____. The Selected Plays of Ben Jonson. Ed. Johanna Procter. (Plays By Renaissance and Restoration Dramatists). 1989.
_____. The Alchemist and Other Plays. Ed. Gordon Campbell. Oxford: Oxford UP, 1995.
_____. Volpone and Other Plays. Ed. Lorna Hutson. (Renaissance Dramatists). Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1998.
_____. Ben Jonson's Plays and Masques. Ed. Richard Harp. 2nd ed. (Norton Critical Edition). New York: Norton, 2001.
_____. (Ben Jonson's masques, ed. Stephen Orgel, for the Yale ed. of Ben Jonson's works).
Spencer, T. J. B., and S. Wells, eds. A Book of Masques. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1967. Rpt. 1980. (Jonson, Daniel, Campion, Beaumont, W. Browne, Davenant).








On Ben Jonson




Biography

Boehrer, Bruce Thomas. "Renaissance Overeating: The Sad Case of Ben Jonson." PMLA 105 (1990): 1071-82.*
Gifford. Life of Ben Jonson. 19th c.
Hazlitt, William. "Benjamin Jonson." In The Lives of the British Poets. London: Nathaniel Cooke, 1854. 1.206-19.*
Riggs, David. Ben Jonson: A Life. Cambridge (MA): Harvard University Press, 1989.





Criticism

Bamborough, J. B. Ben Jonson. New York: Humanities Press, 1970.
Barish, Jonas A. Ben Jonson and the Language of Prose Comedy. Cambridge (MA): Harvard UP, 1960.
_____. From "Jonson and the Loathèd Stage." From A Celebration of Ben Jonson. Ed. William Blisset, Julian Patrick and R. W. Van Fossen. 1973. 32-46. Rpt. in The Critical Perspective: Volume 3: Elizabethan-Caroline. Ed. Harold Bloom. (The Chelsea House Library of Literary Criticism). New York: Chelsea House, 1986. 1508.*
_____, ed. Jonson: Volpone. (Casebooks series). Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1972.
_____, ed. Ben Jonson: A Collection of Critical Essays. Englewood Cliffs (NJ): Prentice-Hall, 1963.*
Barton, Anne. Ben Jonson, Dramatist. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1984.
Bawcutt. N. W. "New Jonson Documents." The Review of English Studies 47.185 (1996): 50-52.*
Beaurline, L. Ben Jonson and Elizabethan Comedy: Essays in Dramatic Rhetoric. San Marino (CA): Huntington Library, 1978.
Bentley, Gerald E. Shakespeare and Jonson: Their Reputations in the Seventeenth Century Compared. Chicago, 1945.
Blisset, William, Julian Patrick and R. W. Van Fossen, eds. A Celebration of Ben Jonson. 1973.
Brady, Jennifer. . (On Ben Jonson). SEL 23 (1983).
Burrow, Colin. "Combative Criticism: Jonson, Milton, and Classical Literary Criticism in England." In The Renaissance. Ed. Glyn P. Norton. Vol. 3 of The Cambridge History of Literary Criticism. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1999. 2001. 487-99.*
Butler, Martin, ed. Re-Presenting Ben Jonson: Text, Performance, History. (Early Modern Literature in History series). Houndmills: Macmillan, 1999..
Carvalho Homem, Rui. "Entre o juiz e o louco: persusos da comédia de Ben Jonson de Volpone a Bartholomew Faiyre. MA diss. U de lisboa, 1986.
_____. "Retórica do Riso: Comédia, Sátira, e um dia na Feira com Ben Jonson." Revista da Faculdade de Letras- Lnguas e Literaturas, in Honorem Prof. Oscar Lopes. 2nd ser. 12 (Porto, 1995): 301-47.
_____. "'A More Familiar Straine': Puppetry and Burlesque, or, Translation as Debasement in Ben Jonson's Bartholomew Fair." In SEDERI VII. Ed. S. González Fernández-Corugedo et al. Coruña: SEDERI, 1996. 179-86.*
Cave, Richard Allen. Ben Jonson. (English Dramatists). Houndmills: Macmillan.
Clare, Janet. "Jonson's 'Comical Satires' and the Art of Courtly Compliment." Refashioning Ben Jonson: Gender, Politics and the Jonsonian Canon. Ed. Julie Sanders. London: Macmillan, 1998. 28-44.
Coles, Chris. How to Study a Renaissance Play: Marlowe, Jonson, Webster. (How to Study series). Houndmills: Macmillan, 1988.
Coren, Pamela. "In the Person of Womankind: Female Persona Poems by Campion, Donne, Jonson." Studies in Philology (Chapel Hill) 98.2 (Spring 2001): 225-51.
http://www.geocities.com/yskretz/campioncoren.html
2004-03-28
Coronato, Rocco. "Carnival Vindicated to Himself? Reappraising Bakhtinized Ben Jonson." Connotations 6.2 (1996/97): 180-203.*
Craig, D. H., ed. Ben Jonson: The Critical Heritage. London: Routledge, 1991.
Dietz, Bernd. "Los Epigramas de Ben Jonson." In Estudios literarios ingleses: Renacimiento y barroco. Ed. Susana Onega. Madrid: Cátedra, 1986. 343-62.*
Dollimore, Jonathan. "8. Sejanus (1603): History and Realpolitik." In Dollimore, Radical Tragedy. 3rd ed. Houndmills: Palgrave, 2004. 134-38.*
Donaldson, Ian. The World Upside Down: Comedy from Jonson to Fielding. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1970.
_____. Jonson's Magic Houses: Essays in Interpretation. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1997.
Dryden, John. Of Dramatic Poesy: An Essay. 1668.
_____. Essay of Dramatic Poesy. Ed. Thomas Arnold, rev. W. T. Arnold. Oxford, 1903.*
_____. An Essay of Dramatic Poesy. In The Great Critics. Ed. J. H. Smith and E. W. Parks. New York: Norton, 1932. 255-310.*
_____. An Essay of Dramatic Poesy. In Literary Criticism: From Plato to Dryden. Ed. Gilbert. 601-58.*
_____. Of Dramatic Poesie. In Of Dramatic Poesie and Other Critical Essays. Ed. George Watson. 2 vols. London, 1962.
_____. Of Dramatic Poesie. Ed. James T. Boulton. Oxford, 1964.
_____. Of Dramatic Poesy: An Essay. In Dryden, Selected Criticism 17-76.*
_____ An Essay of Dramatic Poesy. In Literary Criticism and Theory. Ed. R. C. Davis and L. Finke. London: Longman, 1989. 249-89.*
_____. From An Essay of Dramatic Poesy. InThe Norton Anthology of English Literature. Ed. M. H. Abrams, Stephen Greenblatt et al. New York: Norton, 1999. 1.2114-18.*
Dutton, Richard. Ben Jonson: To the First Folio. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1983.
_____. Ben Jonson: Authority: Criticism. Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1996.
Eliot, T. S. "Ben Jonson." 1919. In Eliot, Selected Essays. 3rd. ed. London: Faber, 1951. 147-60.
_____. "Ben Jonson." 1919. In The Sacred Wood. 1920. 104-22.
_____. "Ben Jonson." In Eliot, El bosque sagrado: Edición bilingüe. San Lorenzo de El Escorial (Madrid): Langre, 2004. 325-60.*
_____. "Ben Jonson." In The Critical Perspective: Volume 3: Elizabethan-Caroline. Ed. Harold Bloom. (The Chelsea House Library of Literary Criticism). New York: Chelsea House, 1986. 1495-98.*
Enright, D. J. From "Poetic Satire and Satire in Verse: A Consideration of Jonson and Massinger." Scrutiny (Winter 1951-52): 211-23. Rpt. in The Critical Perspective: Volume 3: Elizabethan-Caroline. Ed. Harold Bloom. (The Chelsea House Library of Literary Criticism). New York: Chelsea House, 1986. 1542-44.*
Evans, Robert C. Ben Jonson and the Poetics of Patronage. Lewisburg (PA): Bucknell UP, 1989.
_____. "Ben Johnson Reads Daphnis and Chloe." English Language Notes. 27.4 (1990): 28-32.
Fernández López, J. "Horacio y Ben Jonson: Poetaster." In Bimilenario de Horacio. Ed. Rosario Cortés Tovar and José Carlos Fernández Corte. Salamanca: Ediciones Universidad de Salamanca, 1994. 36-76.*
Ferry, Anne. All in War with Time: Love Poetry of Shakespeare, Donne, Jonson, Marvell. 1975.
Fowler, Alastair. "The Silva Tradition in Jonson's The Forrest." In Poetic Traditions of the English Renaissance. Ed. Maynard Mack and George de Forest Lord. New Haven: Yale UP, 1982. 163-80.
Freehafer, John. "Leonard Digges, Ben Jonson, and the Beginning." Shakespeare Quarterly 21 (1970): 63-75.
_____. "Leonard Digges, Ben Jonson, and the Beginning." In Shakespeare and the Literary Tradition. Ed. Stephen Orgel and Sean Keilen. New York and London: Garland, 1999. 239-42.*
García Landa, José Angel. "Jonson, Ben." In García Landa, Vanity Fea 2 Oct. 2012.*
http://vanityfea.blogspot.com.es/2012/10/jonson-ben.html
2012
_____. "Every Man in His Humour / Every Man Out of His Humour." In García Landa, Vanity Fea 17 Oct. 2012.*
http://vanityfea.blogspot.com.es/2012/10/every-man-in-his-humour-every-man-out.html
2012
_____. "The Plot of Volpone." From The Oxford Companion to English Literature. García Landa, José Ángel. "." In García Landa, Vanity Fea 20 Nov. 2012.*
http://vanityfea.blogspot.com.es/2012/11/the-plot-of-volpone.html
2012
García Martínez, Isabel. "Ben Jonson y Molière. Análisis comparativo de su itinerario vital y creador." XIV Congreso de AEDEAN. Bilbao: Servicio Editorial de la Universidad del País Vasco, 1992. 285-94.
Goldberg, Jonathan. James I and the Politics of Literature: Jonson, Shakespeare, Donne and Their Contemporaries. Baltimore and London, 1983.
Gómez Lara, Manuel. "Emblems of Darkness: Othello 1604 and the Masque of Blackness 1605." In SEDERI VII. Ed. S. González Fernández-Corugedo et al. Coruña: SEDERI, 1996. 217-24.*
Gordon, D. J. "Hymenaei: Ben Jonson's Masque of Union." In The Renaissance Imagination. Ed. Stephen Orgel.  Berkeley and London, 1975. (Masque, emblems, iconography).
Grant, Patrick. Literature and the Discovery of Method in the English Renaissance. Athens: U of Georgia P, 1985. (More: Richard III; Jonson: Bartholomew Fair; Donne: Anniversaries; Browne: Religio Medici; Law: Spirit of Love ; on Digby's Annotations, 102-88).
Greene, Thomas M. "Ben Jonson and the Centered Self." SEL 10 (1970): 325-48.
Harp, Richard, and Stanley Stewart, eds. The Cambridge Companion to Ben Jonson. (Cambridge Companions). Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2000.
Haynes, Jonathan. From "Festivity and the Dramatic Economy of Jonson's Bartholomew Fair." ELH (Winter 1984): 645-57. Rpt. in The Critical Perspective: Volume 3: Elizabethan-Caroline. Ed. Harold Bloom. (The Chelsea House Library of Literary Criticism). New York: Chelsea House, 1986. 1520-24.*
_____. The Social Relations of Jonson's Theatre. 1992.
Helgerson, Richard. Self-Crowned Laureates: Spenser, Jonson, Milton, and the Literary System. Berkeley: U of California P, 1983.
_____. "Ben Jonson." In The Cambridge Companion to English Poetry, Donne to Marvell. Ed. Thomas N. Corns. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1993. 148-70.*
Holdsworth, R. V., ed. Jonson: Every Man in His Humour and The Alchemist. (Casebooks series). Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1979.
Hollander, John. Vision and Resonance: Two Senses of Poetic Form.  New York: Oxford UP, 1975.
_____. "Ben Jonson and the Modality of Verse." From Hollander, Vision and Resonance: Two Senses of Poetic Form. 1975. 169-82. Rpt. in The Critical Perspective: Volume 3: Elizabethan-Caroline. Ed. Harold Bloom. (The Chelsea House Library of Literary Criticism). New York: Chelsea House, 1986. 1508-12.*
Ioppolo, Grace. "Author Hissed off Stage." Revs. on Jonson. TLS 31 Jan. 1997: 23.*
Johnson, A. W. Ben Jonson: Poetry and Architecture. c. 1996.
Jonson: Volpone. (Brodie's Notes). Houndmills: Macmillan.
Jonson: Volpone. (Macmillan Master Guides). Houndmills: Macmillan.
Judkins, David C. The Nondramatic Works of Ben Jonson: A Reference Guide. Boston: Hall, 1982.
Kamholtz, Jonathan. . (On Ben Jonson). SEL 23 (1983).
Kernan, Alvin B., ed. Two Renaissance Mythmakers: Christopher Marlowe and Ben Jonson. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins UP, 1977.
Knights, L. C. Drama and Society in the Age of Jonson. Harmondsworth: Penguin.
_____. "Ben Jonson, Dramatist." In The Age of Shakespeare. Vol. 2 of The New Pelican Guide to English Literature. Ed. Boris Ford. Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1982. Rev. 1993. 404-19.*
Knowles, J. "Cecil's Shopping Centre: The Rediscovery of a Ben Jonson Masque in Praise of Trade." TLS 7 Feb. 1997: 14-15.*
Kolbrener, William. "Man to Man: Self-Fashioning in Jonson's To William Pembroke."Texas Studies in Literature and Language 39 (1997): 284-296.*
Lanier, Douglas. 'Better Markes': Ben Jonson and the Institution of Authorship. Forthcoming 1998.
Lee, Jonsook. Ben Jonson's Poesis: A Literary Dialectic of Ideal and History. Charlottesville: UP of Virginia, 1989.
Lemley, John. "Masks and Self-Portraits in Jonson's Later Poetry." ELH 44 (1977): 248-66.
Loewenstein, Joseph. Responsive Readings: Versions of Echo in Pastoral, Epic, and the Jonsonian Masque. New Haven and London: Yale UP, 1984.
_____. "The Jonsonian Corpulence, or the Poet as Mouthpiece." ELH 53 (1986): 491-518.
Lyon, John. "Jonson and Carew on Donne: Censure into Praise." Rice University Studies in English Literature 37.1 (Winter 1997): 97-119.*
MacLean, Hugh. "Ben Jonson's Poems: Notes on the Ordered Society." In Essays in English Literature from the Renaissance to the Victorian Age: Presented to A. S. P. Woodhouse. Ed. M. MacLure and F. W. Watt. Toronto: U of Toronto P, 1964. 43-68.*
Marotti, Arthur F. "All About Jonson's Poetry." ELH 39 (1972): 208-37.
Maus, Katharine Eisaman. Ben Jonson and the Roman Frame of Mind. 1985.
Marcus, Leah S. The Politics of Mirth: Jonson, Herrick, Milton, Marvell and the Defense of Old Holiday Pastimes. Chicago: U of Chicago P, 1986.
McCanles, Michael. Jonsonian Discriminations: The Humanist Poet and the Praise of True Nobility. Toronto: U of Toronto P, 1992.
McClung, William A. The Country House in English Renaissance Poetry. Berkeley: U of California P, 1977.
McDonald, Russ. Shakespeare and Jonson: Jonson and Shakespeare. Hemel Hempstead: Harvester Wheatsheaf, 1988.
Miles, Rosalind. Ben Jonson: His Craft and Art. London: Routledge, 1990.
Miner, Earl. The Cavalier Mode from Jonson to Cotton. Princeton (NJ): Princeton UP, 1971.
Mora, María José, and Rafael Portillo. "'Bless Thee, Jonson, Bless Thee! Thou Art Translated': Versiones españolas de Volpone, 1929-1994." Proceedings of the XIXth International Conference of AEDEAN. Ed. Javier Pérez Guerra et al. Vigo: Departamento de Filoloxía Inglesa e Alemana da Universidade de Vigo, 1996. 419-24.*
Newton, Richard C. "'Ben / Jonson': The Poet in the Poems." In Two Renaissance Mythmakers: Christopher Marlowe and Ben Jonson. ed. Alvin B. Kernan. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins UP, 1977. 165-95.
_____. "'Ben./Jonson": The Poet in the Poems." Rpt. in The Critical Perspective: Volume 3: Elizabethan-Caroline. Ed. Harold Bloom. (The Chelsea House Library of Literary Criticism). New York: Chelsea House, 1986. 1512-20.*
_____. "Jonson and the (Re-)Invention of the Book." In Classic and Cavalier: Essays on Jonson and the Sons of Ben. Ed. Claude J. Summers and Ted-Larry Pebworth. Pittsburgh: U of Pittsburgh P, 1982. 31-55.
Nichols, J. G. The Poetry of Ben Jonson. New York: Barnes and Noble, 1969.
Orgel, Stephen. The Jonsonian Masque. Cambridge (MA): Harvard UP, 1965.
_____. "Jonson and the Amazons." In Soliciting Interpretation: Literary Theory and Seventeenth-Century English Poetry. Ed. Elizabeth D. Harvey and Katherine E. Maus. Chicago: U of Chicago P, 1990. 119-40.*
Orgel, Stephen, and Roy Strong. Inigo Jones: The Theatre of the Stuart Court. 2 vols. Berkeley: Sotheby Parke Bennet; London: U of California P, 1973.
Osselton, N. E. "Ben Jonson's Status as a Grammarian." Dutch Quarterly Review of Anglo-American Letters 12 (1982): 205-12.
Parfitt, George. Ben Jonson: Public Poet and Private Man. New York: Barnes and Noble, 1977.   
Patterson, Annabel. "Lyric and Society in Jonson's Under-wood." In Lyric Poetry: Beyond New Criticism. Ed. Charviva Hosek and Patricia Parker. Ithaca: Cornell UP, 1985. 148-63.
_____. "Jonson, Marvell, and Miscellaneity?" In Poems in Their Place. Ed. Neil Fraistat. Chapel Hill: U of North Carolina P, 1986. 95-118.
Pérez Fernández, José María. "Stoicism and Plain Style in Ben Jonson: An Analysis of Some of His Verse Epistles." Atlantis 18 (June-Dec.1996 [issued 1998]): 337-47.*
Peterson, Richard S. Imitation and Praise in the Poems of Ben Jonson. New Haven: Yale UP, 1981.
Pigman, G. W., III. "Suppressed Grief in Jonson's Funeral Poetry." English Literary Renaissance 13 (1983): 203-20.
Post, Jonathan F. S. "Ben Jonson and the Art of Inclusion." In Post, English Lyric Poetry: The Early Seventeenth Century. London: Routledge, 1999. 2002. 23-53.*
Purkiss, Diane. The Witch in History: Early Modern and Twentieth-Century Representations. London: Routledge, 1996. (Masque of Queens).
Riddell, James A. "The Arrangement of Ben Jonson's Epigrammes." SEL 27 (1987): 53-70.
Rivers, Isabel. The Poetry of Conservatism 1600-1745: A Study of Poets and Public Affairs from Jonson to Pope. Cambridge, 1973. (Marvell, 101-25).
Sackton, A. H. Rhetoric as Dramatic Language in Ben Jonson. New York: Octagon Books, 1967.
Salomé Machado, María. "Shakespeare's The Taming of the Shrew and Jonson's Epicoene: The Women in the Stocks." In SEDERI 9 (1998). Ed. Jesús Cora Alonso et al. Alcalá de Henares: SEDERI / U de Alcalá, 1999. 257-63.*
Sanders, Julie. Ben Jonson's Theatrical Republics. Houndmills: Macmillan, 1998.
Sanders, Julie, Kate Chedgzoy and Susan Wiseman, eds. Refashioning Ben Jonson: Gender, Politics, and the Jonsonian Canon. Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1997.
Schelling, F. E. "Ben Jonson and the Classical School." PMLA 13 (1898): 221-49. Rpt. in Schelling, Shakespeare and Demi-Science. Philadelphia, 1927.
Scodel, Joshua. The English Poetic Epitaph: Commemoration and Conflict from Jonson to Wordsworth. Ithaca: Cornell UP, 1991.
Silver, Victoria. "Totem and Taboo in the Tribe of Ben: the Duplicity of Gender and Jonson's Satires." ELH 62.4 (Winter 1995): 729-58.*
Sinfield, Alan. "Poetaster, The Author, and the Perils of Cultural Production." In Sinfield, Shakespeare, Authority, Sexuality: Unfinished Business in Cultural Materialism. London and New York: Routledge, 2006. 40-52.* (Jonson).
Slights, William W. E. Ben Jonson and the Art of Secrecy. Toronto: U of Toronto P, 1996.
Spingarn, J. E. "The Source of Jonson's Discoveries." Modern Philology 2 (1903): 1-10.
Spurr, Barry. "Varieties of Poetic Style." In Spurr, Studying Poetry. Melbourne: Macmillan Education Australia, 1997. 31-44.* (Marvell, "The Mower to the Glow-Worms"; Johnson, "The Vanity of Human Wishes", Jonson, "Slow, slow, fresh fount"; Tony Harrison, "Bookends").
_____. "The Early Seventeenth Century—The Pilgrimage to the Kingdom of Man." In Spurr, Studying Poetry. Melbourne: Macmillan Education Australia, 1997. 90-133.* (Marvell, Milton, Donne, "The Flea, "A Valediction, Forbidding Mourning." "O my Black Soul"; "Batter My heart"; Herbert, "Jordan I", "Jordan II, "Redemption", "Vertue" "The Pulley"; Crashaw, "On the Wounds of Our Crucified Lord"; Jonson "Epitaph on S. P."; Herrick, "Delight in Disorder"; Milton, Paradise Lost).
Summers, Claude J., and Ted-Larry Pebworth, eds. Classic and Cavalier: Essays on Jonson and the Sons of Ben. Pittsburgh: U of Pittsburgh P, 1982.
Summers, Joseph H. The Heirs of Donne and Jonson. London: Chatto and Windus, 1970.
Swinburne, Algernon Charles. A Study of Ben Jonson. London: Chatto & Windus.
Symonds, John Addington. Ben Jonson. Longmans, 1888.
Tillotson, Geoffrey. "Othello and The Alchemist at Oxford in 1610." In Tillotson, Essays in Criticism and Research. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1942. 41-48.*
Trimpi, Wesley. Ben Jonson's Poems: A Study in the Plain Style. Stanford (CA): Stanford UP, 1962.
_____. "Jonson and the Neo-Latin Authorities for the Plain Style." PMLA 77 (1962).
Trussler, Simon. "5. The Era of the Outdoor Playhouses 1572-1603." In Trussler, The Cambridge Illustrated History of British Theatre. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1994. pbk 2000. 70-89.* (The decline of provincial playing. London's 'theatre districts'. The first prominent playhouses. Techniques of staging. Organization and development of the major companies. Actors, repertoires, 'parts' and 'lines'. The university wits, and the triumph of blank verse. Comedies, histories, tragedies—and jigs. Playwriting as a profession: Shakespeare, Heywood, Jonson. Return of the children, and the 'war of the theatres'. Theatre at court. Death of a consummate actress. Reconstructing the theatres).
van den Berg, Sara. The Action of Ben Jonson's Poetry. Newark: U of Delaware P, 1987.
Vélez Núñez, Rafael. "Ben Jonson's 'Decorous Antimasques'." Actas del XXI Congreso AEDEAN. Ed. F. Toda et al. Sevilla: U de Sevilla, 1999. 337-40.*
_____. "The Poetical Mind in Ben Jonson's Masques." In SEDERI 9 (1998). Ed. Jesús Cora Alonso et al. Alcalá de Henares: SEDERI / U de Alcalá, 1999. 209-14.*
_____. "Ben Jonson y el género inexistente." In Proceedings of the 22nd International Conference of AEDEAN (Asociación Española de Estudios Anglonorteamericanos). Lleida, 17-19 December 1998. Ed. Pere Gallardo and Enric Llurda. Lleida: Edicions de la Universitat de Lleida, 2000. 421-24.*
Venuti, Lawrence. "Why Jonson Wrote Not of Love." Journal of Medieval and Renaissance Studies 12 (1982): 195-220.
Viau, Robert O. "Conservatism Expressed Radically: The Zeal of Jonson's and Swift's Attacks on Zeal." Journal of General Education 34 (1982): 69-83.
Wayne, Don E. "Poetry and Power in Ben Jonson's Epigrammes: The Naming of 'Facts' or the Figuring of Social Relations?" Renaissance and Modern Studies 23 (1979): 70-103.
_____. "Jonson's Sidney: Legacy and Legitimation in The Forest." In Sir Philip Sidney's Achievements. Ed. M. J. B. Allen. New York: AMS, 1990. 227-50.
_____. Penshurst: The Semiotics of Place and the Poetics of History. London, 1984; Madison: U of Wisconsin P, 1984.
Wells, Stanley. Shakespeare and Co.: Christopher Marlowe, Thomas Dekker, Ben Jonson, Thomas Middleton, John Fletcher and the Other Players in His Story. London: Penguin, 2007.
West, William N. "Public Knowledge at Private Parties: Vives, Jonson, and the Circulation of the Circle of Knowledge." Pre-Modern Encyclopaedic Texts: Proceedings of the Second COMERS Congress. Ed. Peter Binkley. E. J. Brill,199, 303-13
Williams, Weldon M. "The Influence of Ben Jonson's Catiline upon John Oldham's Satyrs upon the Jesuits." ELH 11 (1944): 38-62.
_____. [On To Penshurst.] In Williams, The Country and the City. New York: Oxford UP, 1973.
Wilson, Edmund. "Morose Ben Jonson." 1948. In Wilson, The Triple Thinkers. London: Lehmann, 1952. 203-20.
_____. "Morose Ben Jonson." From The Triple Thinkers. 1948. 213-32. Rpt. in The Critical Perspective: Volume 3: Elizabethan-Caroline. Ed. Harold Bloom. (The Chelsea House Library of Literary Criticism). New York: Chelsea House, 1986. 1498-1504.*
Wiltenburg, Robert. Ben Jonson and Self-Love: The Subtlest Maze of All. Columbia and London: U of Missouri P, 1990.
Wimsatt, W. K. "English Neo-Classicism: Jonson and Dryden." In Wimsatt and Brooks, Literary Criticism: A Short History. New York: Knopf, 1957. 174-95.*
Winner, Jack D. (On Ben Jonson). SEL 23 (1983).
Womack, Peter. Ben Jonson. Oxford: Blackwell, 1987.
Yachnin, Paul. Stage-Wrights: Shakespeare, Jonson, Middleton and the Making of Theatrical Value. (New Cultural Studies). U of Pennsylvania P, c. 1998.
Zender, Karl F. "The Unveiling of the Goddess in Cynthia's Revels." Journal of English and German Philology 77 (1978): 37-52.




Films


Volpone. Dir. Maurice Tourneur. Script by Jules Romains, based on Ben Jonson's work. Cast: Harry Baur, Louis Jouvet, Fernand Ledoux, Marion Dorian, France: Ile de France Films, 1941.*
Online at YouTube (elise paris)
http://youtu.be/ooCyMYsZqJo
2012
Volpone. By Ben Jonson. Greenwich Theatre production, dir, Elizabeth Freestone, Cast: Richard Bremmer (Volpone), Mark Hadfield (Mosca), Conrad Westmaas (Nano/Avvocato), Harvey Virdi (Androgyno/Avvocato), Edmund Kinglsey (Castrone/Peregrine/Avvocato), Maxwell Hutcheon (Corbaccio), Tim Steed (Corvino), James Wallace (Sir Politic Would-Be), Aislin McGuckin (Celia), Peter Bankole (Bonario/Corvino's Servant), Brigid Zengeni (Lady Would Be). Prod. Film dir. Chris Cowey. DVD. London: Stage on Screen, 2010.*


Internet resources


"Ben Jonson (1572-1637)." Luminarium.*
http://www.luminarium.org/sevenlit/jonson/
2011






Journals

The Ben Jonson Journal. Annual. Vol. 1 (1996).
Ed. Richard Harp and Stanley Stewart.
Department of English , UNLV,
Box 4555069, 4505 Maryland Parkway,
Las Vegas, NV 89154-5069.
E-mail: harplh@nevada.edu



Literature

Carew, Thomas. "To Ben Jonson." Poem. c. 1631, pub. 1640. In The Norton Anthology of English Literature. Ed. M. H. Abrams, Stephen Greenblatt, et al. New York: Norton, 1999. 1659-60.*
Cleveland, John. Elegy on Ben Jonson.
Dekker, Thomas. Satiromastix or the Untrussing of the Humorous Poet. Drama. Acted 1602. (vs. Ben Jonson).
Ionsonus Virbivs: or, The Memorie of Ben: Johnson Revived By The Friends of The Muses. London: Henry Seile, 1638. (Elegies).
Oldham, John. "Upon the Works of Ben Jonson." Ode.



Music

Johnson, Robert. "Have You Seen the Bright Lily Grow." From Ben Jonson, The Devil Is an Ass, 1616. In Songs from the Labyrinth: Music by John Dowland: Performed by Sting and Edin Karamazov. CD. Hamburg: UMG-Deutsche Grammophon, 2006.*
Strauss, Richard. Die schweigsame Frau. Comic opera in three acts. Libretto by Stefan Zweig, based on Ben Jonson's play The Silent Woman. 1935.
_____. Die schweigsame Frau. Hans Hötter. Georgine von Milinkovic, Hermann Prey, Fritz Wunderlich, Hilde Güden, Pierette Alarie, Hetty Plümacher, Josef Knapp, Karl Dönch, Alois Pernerstorfer. Chor der Wiener Staatsoper. Wiener Philharmoniker / Karl Böhm. (Salzburger Festspiele 1959: Festspielhaus 6. August). 2 CDs. (Festspiel Dokumente; rec. ORF).  Hamburg: Deutsche Grammophon, 1994.* (Libretto in German and English).




Video


Sherman, Ted. "Jonson, Herbert, Herrick, Marvell Lecture 1." YouTube (Ted Sherman) 7 May 2013.*
http://youtu.be/sOg0vshskOc
2013




  from
A Bibliography of Literary Theory, Criticism and Philology
http://www.unizar.es/departamentos/filologia_inglesa/garciala/bibliography.html
by José Ángel García Landa
(University of Zaragoza, Spain)







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The Old Man and the Sea (1989)





The Old Man and the Sea. Dir. Jud. Taylor. Written for television by Roger O. Hirson. Based on the novel by Ernest Hemingway.  Cast: Anthony Quinn, Gary Cole, Patricia Clarkson, Alexis Cruz, Joe Santos, Valentina Quinn, Francesco Quinn, Paul Calderon, Sully Diaz, Jaime Tirelli, Raul Davila, James McDaniel, René Rivera, Steven Rodriguez, Manuel Santiago. Music by Bruce Broughton. Ed. Frederic Steinkamp. Photog. Tony Imi. Exec. prod. William F. Storke. Co-exec. prod. Keith Richardson, Brian Harris. Co-prod. Norman Foster. Prod. des. Malcolm J. Middleton. Prod. Robert E. Fuisz. William F. Storke / Robert E. Fuisz  / Yorkshire Television, 1989.




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Jueves 23 de octubre de 2014


Consiliencia y retrospección



una publicación de Narratología evolucionista - Evolutionary Narratology.



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Pre-Adamites




una publicación de Narratología evolucionista - Evolutionary Narratology.



This notion of "harmonizing strategies" between different disciplines they discuss may be related to Whewell's notion of consilience. More on consilience here:  CONSILIENCE AND RETROSPECTION.


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Miércoles 22 de octubre de 2014

Aquí estoy, en Teoría

Figuro como referencia, gracias a mi bibliografía, no sólo en el artículo sobre Teoría Literaria, de la Wikipedia española, junto a un puñadito pequeño de teorizadores españoles—


... sino también, y allí hay menos españoles, en la Teoría Literaria de la Wikipedia en inglés.  Y en la alemana


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Guitarra y playa 2

Guitarra y playa 2




Martes 21 de octubre de 2014

Sigo subiendo en el SSRN

Sigo subiendo en el SSRN



Llegando al puesto 27 (de 270.000) en número de artículos subidos este año; al puesto 29 por número de artículos subidos, y al puesto 828 por número de descargas:


Captura de pantalla 2014-10-22 a la(s) 00.02.26

Y de Author Rank global estoy en el puesto 2284, y subiendo. De entre esos 270.000.


Escalando el Author Rank



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En el Anthro





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Con la guitarra cerca del mar


Con la guitarra cerca del mar



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Lunes 20 de octubre de 2014

Carew and the Cavaliers

From Legouis and Cazamian's History of English Literature (The End of the Renascence, II: Poetry from 1625 to 1660).

1. Long Poems which were Failures.—At the death of James I, in 1625, Spenser's influence was almost exhausted, surviving only in Milton. It was Ben Jonson and especially John Donne who now had disciples and imitators. Poets were numerous down to the Restoration, but, except for Milton, they were the poets of the anthologies whose memory lives only in slight lyrics or collections of small poems.12 and to name them will sufficiently show how abundant was the production in this unfortunate genre.

The ambition to write works on a vast scale had not died out, but the efforts to realize it were failures. The epical ambition which was then common to Europe, and which produced more than one pitifully abortive poem in France, was no more successful in England. Long romances in verse and attempts at classical epics constitute what is dead in the literature of the time; their titles and the names of almost all their authors are forgotten. They have been collected only by the historical zeal of the present day, 
They consist of metrical romances, like Patrick Hannay's Sheretine and Mariana (1622), the Leoline and Sydanis (1642) of Sir Francis Kynaston, who had previouly modernized Chaucer's Troilus and Criseyde, and W. Chamberlayne's Pharonnida, in six books (1659). There are also mythological narratives; Shackerley Marmion's Cupid and Psyche (1637) and William Bosworth's Arcadius and Sepha (1651): long, religious narratives like Edward Benlowes's Theophila, in nine cantos (1652), and epics like Davenant's Gondibert (1650), which is in quatrains, and Cowley's Davideis (1656), which is classical in manner and has a Hebrew theme.

Invariably poetic qualities and readable passages are scattered here and there in these ambitious works, but on the whole they were stillborn, and have no importance in literary thistory save that a path leads over their graves to Milton's Paradise Lost.

If dead poetry be left on one side, and the attempt be then made to classify the poets of the middle seventeenth century, they are seen to fall into two main groups, separated by the differences which make the history of this troubled period. There are first the secular poets, all in the Royalist ranks and therefore known as Cavaliers, and secondly there are religious poets, subdivided into the Anglicans and the Puritans. The division is social rather than literary, but it is simple and convenient, and corresponds sufficiently to the diversity of inspiration.


2. Thomas Carew (1598?-1639). –The poet who first, before the Civil War, showed what the spirit of the Cavaliers was to be, and first was affected by the combined influence of Jonson and Donne, was Thomas Carew, a gentleman of the court of Charles I who was a reputed wit. He was a courtly and polished love-poet whom his rivals suspected of working long at his elegant verses. The logical good order of the classicists rules his mind even when, in his poems to Celia, he returns to a theme of the Petrarchists. He can isolate a thought, follow it up faithfully and balance its several parts, and many of his light sets of verses have won, in consequence, a place in anthologies. He has little sensibility—he had indeed a reputation for dryness—but his sensual ardour enables him to avoid the coldness of gallantry. Such, in any case, is the character betrayed by his longest poems and his masterpiece, The Rapture, unfortunately no less indecent than the verses of Aretino. It is an invitation to Celia to flout 'the Giant Honour' and enjoy forbidden pleasures without scruple. The paradise he paints to her is one of the most licentious even of those inspired by the Italian Renaissance. His attack on honour recalls Sidney's Astrophel and especially Donne's Elegies. He is also inspired by the speeches of Petronius in the anonymous tragedy Nero (Act IV, sc. vii), but in libertine audacity he outdoes his models.
carew
Carew is connected with Donne by the fine elegy with which he honoured his memory. The poem has more feeling than is customary with Carew and is, moreover, one of the best pieces of criticism written in this period. No one has pointed out more accurately than Carew what was new in Donne, his contempt for outworn ornament and his need of personal and virile expression. Yet Donne left few traces upon his style. If Carew has none of the master's flashes of genius, he escapes the worst faults of his style. In his commendatory verses he shows that his thought was vigorous and direct, especially in those to Georges Sandys, who, after translating Ovid, gave up secular poetry and translated the Psalms. Carew confesses that he dare not greet 'the holy place with his unhallowed feet', but that his muse, like 'devout penitents of old', stays 'humbly waiting at the porch,' listening to the sacred strains. Yet he thinks that one day his eyes,

Now hunting glow-worms, may adore the sun,

and that:

My eyes in penitential dew may steep
That brine which they for sensual love did weep.

The poem is beautiful, and so restrained that it seems sincere. It is consistent with Clarendon's account of the poet's edifying death.

His was, however, a death-bed conversion. All his poetry is the work of an amorist, such as Milton despised. He writers 'persuasions' to love, madrigals, complaints and reproaches, addressed to a mistress, lines to his 'inconstant mistress,' who shall be 'damned for ther false apostasy,' to Celia singing, to Celia when he sends her red and white roses:

In the white you may discover
The paleness of a fainting lover;
In the red, the flames still feeding
On my heart with fresh wounds bleeding.

In the famous song, Ask me no more, he finds all the beauties of nature united in his mistress—the rose of June

For in your beauties, orient deep,
These flowers, as in their causes, sleep;

the 'golden atoms of the day' which 'enrich her hair,' the nightingale's song:

For in your sweet dividing throat,
She winters, and keeps warm her note.

The theme is commonplace, but in the harmonious quatrains of this song it is turned with perfect elegance.

Carew's work is slight, much distilled, but some warmth of imagination and a certain fancy temper its coldness. The style and the versification are so polished that Waller and Denham the acknowledged pioneers of the classical school, could hardly improve on them.

3. The Cavalier Poets. —Carew is the typical court poet. Sir John Suckling (1609-42) 3 typifies the Cavaliers, their loyalty, dash, petulancy, frivolity, easy morals, and wit. Rich, spendthrift, valiant, a gamester and a gallant, an amateur of the drama who wrote four not unsuccessful plays, and a faithful admirer of Shakespeare, Suckling mocked at the pains which Carew took to polish his verses. He was himself an improviser, one whose work is very unequal but who writers with irresistible swing. It is his light, impertinent tone which characterises him. He recalls Donne when he rallies woman on her capriciousness or himself on his inconstancy; but while he has the master's hyperbole he leaves his metaphysics alone. He discharges his mockery in the form of little, swiftly moving, neatly turned songs, irony sometimes hiding the madrigal, as in Out upon it.  His easy and flippancy are French rather than English, and it has been thought that a sojourn which he made in France before he was twenty influenced his muse. Less slight than the rest of his work is the Ballad upon a Wedding in which a farmer describes, in picturesque language, a wedding at which he has been present. Here there are many lively and homely descriptive touches, as well as wit and spirit. Suckling puts new life and freshness into the conventional epithalamium. Not until Thomas Moore did any one else show such skill at writing charming verses about nothing. 'Natural, easy Suckling,' as Congreve's Millamant calls him, whose life was short and who versified only as a pastime, had a considerable production. Beneath his apparent frivolity there was, as his poems prove, romantic generosity, and even, as his letter to Henry Jermyn shows, a power of reflecting on politics. His treatise, An Account of Religion by Reason, in which he combats the Socinian heresies, is proof that he also cared for religion. The contrasts in him are characteristic of a time in which libertinage often rubbed shoulders with piety.

Richard Lovelace (1618-58)4 was neither so correct as Carew nor so natural as Suckling. This most handsome Cavalier whose figure fascinated the ladies, this faithful follower of the king who was twice imprisoned and finally ruined for the cause, so that he ended his short life in the most abject poverty, was a very unequal poet. In his Lucasta (1649) the cold, hyperbolical compliments of the degenerate sonneteers occur side by side with Donne's obscure extravagance. The lack of art in his work is as apparent as its mannerisms, and almost all of it has been forgotten. But it was his fortune to make two or three songs in which his sense of honour is in manly alliance with his love. It was he who wrote to Althea from prison:

Stone walls do not a prison make,
    Nor iron bars a cage;
Minds innocent and quiet take
    That for an hermitage.
If I have freedom in my love,
    And in my soul am free,
Angels alone that soar above
    Enjoy such liberty.

It was he who wrote 'to Lucasta on going to the wars':

I could not love thee, dear, so much,
Loved I not honour more.

Because of these few short poems, Lovelace has the glory of having expressed the ideal of the Cavalier.

He shares it with Montrose (1612-50), the noble Scottish champion of Charles I, whose brilliant victories were followed by disaster, death, and quartering, if the Royalist hero of Scotland really wrote the fine loyalist verses attributed to him.

John Cleveland (1613-58),5 a Royalist like these other poets, who, unlike them, was of humble origin, was very different from them. He was, above all, a satirist, and he enjoyed in his own century a popularity which his vigour and his wit deserved. But his countless slight topical allusions make him difficult to read to-day. He was, moreover, one of Donne's most determined imitators, and conceits abound in his poems. The best known of them is The Rebel Scot, a fiery attack on the nation which had just delivered Charles I to the Parliament. This satirist, with his rude style, often, while turning an epigram, wrote such isolated couplets as Dryden affected, and in spite of his metaphysical strangeness he blazed the track of political satire for that poet. He did not, however, write only satires. He composed love-poetry in which a touch of real nature varies, from time to time, the extravagant gallantry, and he made some curious lyrical essays in which he was one of the first poets to realize the value of the anapaest.

It is tempting to connect Lord Herbert of Cherbury (1583-1648), 6 George Herbert's elder brother, with these Royalist poets. He is, because of his curious Autobiography, better known for his prose than for his verses, which contain a suble quintessence of poetry. His handsome person, his extravagant valour, his passion for duelling, and his refined gallantry made him a representative Cavalier, and his Ode upon a Question moved, whether Love should continue for ever, gives him a high place among the Petrarchists and the disciples of Sir Philip Sidney.

4. Robert Herrick. —Midway between the Cavaliers and the Anglicans, Robert Herrick (1591-1674),7 the most gifted and the most exquisite of all these poets, has place. The anacreontiscism of the poetry of his youth makes him one of the Cavaliers, and since, at the age of thiry-eight, he accepted a Devonshire living and did his best to convert his muse, he is also to be numbered among the Anglicans. His only collection of poems, the Hesperides, published in 1648, contains his 'works both human and divine.' The former consist of 1,129 short sets of verses, the latter of only 271, and the proportion may be taken to that in which his inspiration was secular and sacred.

The son of a London goldsmith, who from Cambridge returned to London and a life of dissipation, who in the reign of James I, while his youth lasted, was a frequenter of the literary taverns, this lover of wine, women and song, and 'son' of Ben Jonson, was induced to take orders only for the sake of a livelihood. When he bade a sad farewell to London and his muse and departed to his living of Dean Prior, in Devonshire, he resolved, like a man of honour, to be a good parson. But he had no enthusiasm for his new duties. The change was too great for this charming rhymester cast up among the savages. He petted both his muse and a few of his female parishioners. Then, little by little, helped by his recollections of pastorals, he acquired a taste for the rich countryside in which he found himself and for the ways of rustic life. He became attached also to his church and his little vicarage; he trusted in the good people's God, to whose infinite indulgence he could leave the frolics of his youth and certain lapses of his maturity, whose anger would not be roused because the very secular Hesperides were printed side by side with the Holy Numbers [Noble Numbers]. 'Jocund his muse was, but his life was chaste,' he said of himself. It was self-flattery. His portrait at the beginning of the Hesperides shows a torso like that of a merry Priapus, a sensuous, mocking mouth beneath an aquiline nose, a head bristling with crisp, luxuriant hair, a chest left bare. This is a real pagan from a garden where Cupids dance in a ring, while Pegasus, standing on a hillock, is poised for flight.

Herrick's works are by themselves an anthology, a collection of short poems brought together on no principle and without any order. He adopts 'sweet disorder' as an aesthetic principle, loves it in poetry as much as in woman's dress. He goes further and mingles the coarsest epigrams with poetry that is winged and delicate. Every contradiction of his mobile spirit, all his fleeting feelings and thoughs, are grouped haphazard. Even his 'many dainty mistresses' sometimes clash, and we can only hope that, if they were real, they were successive. He hates monotony, sharing the national craving for variety so conspicuous in the drama. He alternates the pretty with the ugly, the fragant with the evil-smelling. But nothing really counts in his works except its quality of exquisiteness, of which there is in profusion.hesperides

On occasion, Herrick was capable of sustained effort. He has some epithalamiums and some rustic pieces, like the Hock Cart, or Harvest Home, which have spirit and savour. One of the most famous of his poems is Corinna's going a-Maying, which contains five fourteen-line stanzas. It is among the most charming of songs of the dawn, fragant with flowers, rich as a poem by Spenser, and it has the merest hint of the ingenious fancy of the metaphysical poets:

Rise, and put on your foliage, and be seen
To come forth, like the spring-time, fresh and green,
     And sweet as Flora.

This poem has become the classic of all the English songs on May.

But Herrick's truest imprint is on that multitude of tiny poems which seem to be made of a breath of air—charming madrigals, love-fancies, addresses to flowers, brief epitaphs. The light joy of a frivolous heart, a fancy pleased by whatever has grace or beauty; the tenous melancholy of a reveller who remembers how ephemeral is that which charms him; such are his moods, and to the latter of them he returns again and again as he watches the flowers in his garden—the roses, the daffodils, the blossoms of the fruit-trees, the meadows whih 'have been fresh and green' and are left 'to lament.' The esssence of this mood is in a trifle about cherry-blossoms:

Ye may simper, blush and smile,
And perfume the air awhile;
But, sweet things, ye must be goine,
Fruit, ye know, is coming on;
Then, ah! then, where is your grace,
Whenas cherries come in place?

Never again did a poet of the west have so light a touch. The secret seems to be kept by Japan or China.

His epitaphs are endlessly graceful. They do not weigh down the graves on which they are but poised with the delicate grace of flowers, for instance this upon a child:

Virgins promised when I died
That they would each primrose-tide
Duly, morn, and evening, come,
And with flowers dress my tomb.
Having promised, pay your debt,
Maids, and here strew violets.

When this voluptuary was in bed with fever he called on music to dispel his pain:

     Then make me weep
     My pains asleep;
And give me such reposes
     That I, poor I,
     May think thereby
     I live and die
         'Mongst roses.

Everywhere his simplicity is seasoned with a strangeness—Mad Maid's Song, Grace for a Child, The Night-piece, to Julia. He is inspired by the Anthology and by Jonson, who had made fine translations from it; but while Jonson took extreme pains, Herrick seems to sing spontaneously. He can be reminiscent, recalling Marlowe's pastoral or Shakespeare's fairies or Herbert's pious verses, but whatever he takes is transposed and lightened. He reverses La Fontaine's otherwise just verdict on the English, that they 'think profoundly.' Herrick thinks, feels, and writes lightly. He touches nothing; he barely skims its surface. For he was without moral sense. He knew only delicate enjoyment, neither satiety, passion, nor remorse. He is the most epicurean of the moderns. His life, in the time of the Civil War and so near to Milton, seems a defiance. His metres, fluid as water, and his delicately varied stanzas, are surprising in their proximity to regularized verse, to the couplet which Waller and Denham fixed and stabilized and which increasingly became the vehicle of didacticism. Herrick, born in the Elizabethan age, was in the succeeding period the perfect artist in slight verse, while Milton, with his sovereign art, reigned over grander poetry.

5. The Anglican and Catholic Poets. Herrick, a pagan clergyman, represents no more than the lax Anglicanism of his time. The renewal of faith within the Catholic Church, provoked by the Protestant attacks, had its counterpart in England in the revived fervour of the Anglican clergy whom the Presbyterians attacked. We have seen the effects of their stimulated zeal in the prose of preachers and controversialists, and it also left its mark on poetry. Hooker had exemplified Anglican weightiness and the Anglican grasp of political principles. In the seventeenth century the ardour of many Anglicans reached even to mysticism. The pious fervour shown under James I by the brothers Phineas and Giles Fletcher became widespread under Charles I and during the persecutions of the Commonwealth. Reason became the ally, sometimes the subordinate, of imagination and sentiment. Fancy and a certain singularity were added to them, partly in consequence of the changed literary models. Poets were inspired no longer by Spenser but by Donne, whose influence was even more marked on the pious poets than on the Cavaliers.

This double tendency perceptible under Charles I and during Laud's tenure of power, on the one hand towards the restoration of the religious practices, the material accompaniments and the very millinery of Catholic ritual, and on the other towards a renewal of monastic asceticism, was combined with a taste for the metaphysical element in the sometimes truly beautiful and always curious writings of such as Herbert, Crashaw, Vaughan, and Traherne.

(....)



Notes (renumbered)

1. E. Gosse, Seventeenth Century Studies (1883); B. Wendell, The Seventeenth Century in English Literature (1904).
    Collections of verse: Cavalier and Courtier Lyrists (Canterbury Poets, 1891); G. Saintsbury, Seventeenth Century Lyrists (undated); J. H. Massingham, A Treasury of Seventeenth Century English Verse (1919; H. J. C. Grierson,
Metaphysical Lyrics and Poems of the Seventeenth Century (1921).

2. Minor Poets of the Caroline Period, ed. Saintsbury, 3 vols. (Clarendon Press, 1906-21).

3. Poems, Plays, and Other Remains of Sir John Suckling, ed. Hazlitt, 2 vols. (1892); The Works of Sir John Suckling, ed. Thompson (1910).

4. Lucasta, ed. Hazlitt (2nd ed. 1897).

5. Edited by Saintsbury in Minor Poets of the Caroline Period, vol. iii; The Poems of John Cleveland, ed. Berdan (1911).

6. His poems were published by Collins in 1881, and were edited by G. C. Moore Smith for the Clarendon Press (Poems English and Latin) in 1923.
    See Rémusat, Herbert de Cherbury (Paris, 1874).

7. Hesperides, ed. by Pollard, with introduction by Swinburne, in the Muses' Library, 2 vols. (1891); by Saintsbury in the Aldine Poets Series, 2 vols. (1893); by Rhys in Everyman's Library (1908); by F. W. Moorman (1921).
    See F. W. Moorman, Robert Herrick, a Biographical and Critical Study (1910); F. Delattre, Contribution à l'étude de la poésie anglaise au XVIIe siècle (1910; the capital work on Herrick).





The Caroline Poets 1: The Cavalier poets


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Noh-Kabuki

Una exposición de estampas de teatro japonés que vemos en el Paraninfo de la Universidad de Zaragoza:


noh-kabuki

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Poems by Edmund Waller













Caroline Poetry: The Cavalier Poets





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Bibliografía sobre Sigmund Freud



Bibliografía de y sobre Sigmund Freud—en relación a la crítica literaria mayormente:


Freud.S by katiesingh





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Domingo 19 de octubre de 2014

Barco incendiado en Beluso


Barco incendiado en Beluso



—oOo—





En el principio era el mito


Aquí nos citan, en rumano:


Mamulea, Mona. "La început a fost povestea: Despre functia cognitiva a naratiunii în mitologie si stiinta." In Simpozionul National 'Constantin Noica': Editia a IV-a: "La Început era cuvântul." ["In the Beginning Was the Word"]. Bucarest: Editura Academiai Romane, 2013. 35-41.

https://es.scribd.com/doc/175934358/


—oOo—






Oyendo a la Ronda de Boltaña en Biescas




Aquí en la Feria de Otoño, como los almendrones.  Quién me iba a decir a mí...




—oOo—



En el Cognition & the Arts eJournal




—oOo—

El barrio de la casa de las mansardas azules



El barrio de la casa de las mansardas azules



—oOo—



Sábado 18 de octubre de 2014

Defensa de mi tesis sobre Beckett




Aquí puede verse:

_____. "Defensa de la Tesis Doctoral 'El relato en la trilogía de Beckett Molloy, Malone Dies, The Unnamable." Universidad de Zaragoza, 1988. Online edition (2004):
http://www.unizar.es/departamentos/filologia_inglesa/garciala/publicaciones/defensa.html

_____. "Defensa de la Tesis Doctoral 'El relato en la trilogía de Beckett Molloy, Malone Dies, The Unnamable." Academia.edu 25 March 2014.*
https://www.academia.edu/6536400/

_____. "Defensa de la Tesis Doctoral 'El relato en la trilogía de Beckett Molloy, Malone Dies, The Unnamable." ResearchGate 18 Oct. 2014.
https://www.researchgate.net/publication/267029609
DOI: 10.13140/2.1.4826.3680


—oOo—


Bibliografía sobre el realismo

—Una de ellas, sobre estética realista, procedente de mi Bibliografía de teoría literaria, crítica y filología. También tengo otras sobre novela realista, etc.

Realism by marcosclopes



—oOo—




Aguantando hasta última hora


Aguantando hasta última hora

—oOo—


Viernes 17 de octubre de 2014


THE STORY IN ALL STORIES


Doy por finalizado este sitio web, THE STORY IN ALL STORIES: Cosmology, Evolution, (Big) History and Representation, ante la dificultad creciente de manejo de la plataforma Storify. Continuaré tratando estas cuestiones en las secciones correspondientes de mi blog, en Blogger mientras aguante—que a fin de cuentas viene siendo el sistema de publicación en red más fiable y flexible para propósitos varios.

Lo mismo voy a hacer con la otra historia que abrí recientemente en Storify, El Gran Teatro del Mundo, dedicada a la teatralidad de la vida y del teatro, y apenas empezada. Pero una cosa es editar varios blogs, que a eso sí que llego—otra es pasarme el día viendo la bolita de colores girar. La vida entera es demasiado corta para eso, así que sintiéndolo mucho dejo el sitio por imposible, y nos veremos aquí con los medios de a bordo.

Sigo en cambio editando de momento este blog temático que abrí en ScoopIt, Retrospection: esta otra plataforma no me da problemas, pero sin previo pago sólo me deja llevar un blog. Así que seguimos entretanto en Blogger, y que nos dure.

_____


PS. Es más, les voy a dar un pequeño recorrido más, de prueba a estos blogs, en condiciones reducidas. Me he cambiado el disco duro y la memoria Ram por otras más potentes, y parece que de momento puede con ellos el ordenador. Ya veremos cuánto tardo en desbordarlo otra vez, con mis grandes historias y teatros del Mundo.


Go Go Go Goooogle

—oOo—


Satan rewritten as the Good Guy






There's a complete video course on John Milton at Yale, by John Rogers, at Yale Courses. This is the last video, on Samson Agonistes.

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL4DF1CBD715CEC2F8






—oOo—



II Seminario HERAF




Ya ha salido el programa del II seminario del Grupo de investigación sobre Hermenéutica y Antropología Fenomenológica (HERAF). Este segundo seminario versa sobre "Corporalidad, Temporalidad y Espacialidad", y yo hablaré sobre la complejidad del tiempo humano en G. H. Mead.

Acaba de publicarse un libro basado en el primer seminario terminado este año, Individuo y espacio público, editado por Juan Velázquez (Berlín: Logos Verlag, 2014).





—oOo—






Estos lloran, y después maman















Individuo y espacio público

Aparece en Alemania, o aquí, este libro del grupo HERAF, un volumen colectivo con un capítulo mío,

"4. El dividuo social: roles, marcos interaccionales y (nuevos) medios." En Individuo y espacio público. Ed. Juan Velázquez.  Berlín: Logos Verlag, 2014. 99-116.

http://www.logos-verlag.de/cgi-bin/buch/isbn/3730



Individuo y espacio público


En la web de HERAF




—oOo—






Chicas en el agua

Chicas en el agua


—oOo—







La narración en el teatro contemporáneo

Me citan en esta tesis de la Universidad Montfort sobre narración en el teatro contemporáneo:

Swettenham, Neal. The Role and Status of Narrative in Contemporary Theatre. Ph.D. diss., De Montfort U, 2003. En red en
https://www.dora.dmu.ac.uk/bitstream/handle/2086/4317/271923.pdf


—oOo—





Los mamarrachos traidores de Barcelona—y los de Madrit



Y en la tertulia, Rajoy no reacciona.



—oOo—






York Mystery Plays





—and John Heywood's Play of the Weather.

—oOo—



Miércoles 15 de octubre de 2014

Bea-ch

Bea-ch

Estamos aquí, según se mire, a las alturas de finales de julio.

—oOo—






The Notion of Semiosphere



Introduction to Semiosphere - 2010 from Dimitar Trendafilov



Otra manera de decirlo, quizá, es que la semiosfera es la realidad en la que vivimos, entendida como realidad virtual—realidad aumentada o semióticamente constituida. Junto con todos los diversos códigos semióticos y estrategias de interpretación que nos permiten navegar por ella.

Semiosphere of Narratology


—oOo—








Entrando en la Trilogía

Estoy subiendo a la SSRN, por capítulos, el libro Samuel Beckett y la narración reflexiva. Es el primero que publiqué, en 1992, basado en la tesis doctoral de 1988. Aquí va de momento el primer tercio, y lo demás irá siguiendo.

Introducción a 'Samuel Beckett y la Narración Reflexiva':  http://ssrn.com/abstract=2505110

1. Conceptos básicos de narratología: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2422327

2. El status narrativo en la Trilogía: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2507744

3. Entrando en la Trilogía: la narración en 'Molloy': http://ssrn.com/abstract=2506925

4. Movimientos narrativos: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2510225




—oOo—





Bajo los muchos puentes



Bajo los muchos puentes

—oOo—


El gobierno catalán renuncia al referéndum

—y anuncia un butifarréndum. Aquí la tertulia de Federico:







—oOo—

Martes 14 de octubre de 2014

Los caminos de la lengua

Los caminos de la lengua, que ahora localizo en Google Books, es un volumen de homenaje a Enrique Alcaraz, publicado en 2010.  Tengo en él un artículo en la página 1053, "Narratología del sujeto y su trayectoria vital." En esta vista previa de Google no aparece, pero aquí está también en ResearchGate.  El poema de Borges del que hablo allí lo cantaba María José Hernández en "Danzón Porteño", así.








—oOo—






Lunes 13 de octubre de 2014

History of Science






—oOo—



Don't Think Twice It's All Right


Hace seis años ya iba yo colgando canciones en YouTube... y hace siete también, sólo que las más viejas las borré por error. ¡Eh, que hay que tener en cuenta que por entonces YouTube apenas existía! Igual ésta la debería haber borrado por error, pero ahí va, o ahí vuelve. Es también de las primeras canciones de Bob Dylan que me gustaron—The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan es el primer disco que me compré, de hecho, allá por mediados de los setenta. Y aquí seguimos, diciendo siempre adiós, aunque sea siempre mucho decir.





No es de mis canciones más vistas ni más visitás..... y esas tampoco son muy vistas, aunque estén muy vistas.


—oOo—





El autor implícito y el narrador no fiable

nofiable-libre.pdf by martinadan




—oOo—





Una isla


Una isla

—oOo—


La novela histórica - Parámetros para su definición

novelah-libre.pdf by martinadan





—oOo—





Domingo 12 de octubre de 2014

Robert Wilson / Rufus Wainwright / Shakespeare's Sonnets


Aquí la ópera en que colaboran Robert Wilson y Rufus Wainwright, basada en los sonetos de Shakespeare e interpretada por el Berliner Ensemble:







—Y aquí un diálogo con ocasión de su presentación en Brooklyn:






Trátenla con cuidado que es arte de vanguardia.


—oOo—



CFP: Memory and Theatre

CALL FOR PAPERS (via PsyArt)



Call for Papers
Memory and Theatre: performing the Archive
An International Conference
TANGIER/TETOUAN, MOROCCO 2, 3, 4, 5 MAY 2015

            Current performance practice and research are caught in an ambiguous compromise comparable to what Jacques Derrida has evocatively termed ‘archive fever’. Archival revivals — from the digitization of performance, to re-enactments of past traumas and art works, to the staging of interventions into existing archives — place the discourses of preservation and intervention in creative tension, inscribing an anxiety towards ephemerality while simultaneously critiquing conservation. Theatre’s liveness and transience are often accompanied by the urgent need for documentation before they enter the mnemonic field of embodied memory. Still, archived documentations of live performance shall never capture the traces of lived yet ephemeral experience.
            The questions which arise in the context of our reflections bring to our attention the complexities between two different logics: performance and archive, disappearance and documentation. The archive logic explored by Derrida’s Archive Fever invokes a dialectical oscillation between commencement and commandment; it combines the practice of storing and restoring. Unlike museums’ tasks of “archiving, categorizing and indexing”, performance “challenges categorization, which was originally its point […] It’s not always an easy fit, but maybe what’s interesting is the way in which the past is reframed in the present.”[1] Following the thread of thought of Rebecca Schneider, reenactments challenge the existing archives and their logic in organizing and reflecting memory and history.
            The term ‘reenactment’ is charged with repetition and repercussion. It is the “practice of replaying or re-doing a precedent event, artwork, or art […] a critical mode of remaining, as well as a mode of remaining critical.” (Schneider, 2-7) It is both an act of documentation as well as a challenge to disappearance. The cultural urge to document the ‘Arab Spring’ — and the ‘years of lead’ — explains a great deal about the desire for reenacting the memory of the past/future. Arabic reenactments of the Arab Spring render the pastness of the past “both palpable and a very present matter.” (Schneider, 30)
            Inspired from our previous discussions we propose a double-edged dialogue, which is artist-driven and research-oriented. The conference also seeks to tease out some of the complexities related to the body as memory. It is a call for more critical attention to archival revivals and re-enactments of memories of the past that have become so visible also in Arabo-Islamic contexts. We invite scholars from around the world to join the debate and offer elements of reflection on the various problematics related to the following proposed panels:
·      Archival revivals between preservation and intervention
·      Sites of memory “a will to remember” (Pierre Nora): the interplay between monumentalization, performance and memory politics.
·      Body as memory and site of agency: staging a body of memories to reveal memories of the body
·      Performing the memory of the past: memory and theatre in the countries of the Arab Spring
·      Performing the archive of the Moroccan ‘years of lead’
Keynote Speakers: (to be announced later)
Memory and Theatre: presentations by eminent practitioners and scholars// Round tables with guest speakers from the field of performance and academy// Performances// Installations// Workshops (to be announced later)…
The conference is part of the International Festival “Performing Tangier” now in its 11th edition. The theme was carefully chosen as a follow up of our previous international conferences, with the expectation that it would be sharp enough to elicit diverse intellectual contributions from distinguished experts and colleagues from many parts of the world and in many areas of research. Besides academic panel sessions, the conference program will be nourished by a rich artistic public agenda with workshops, exhibitions, book launch, and diverse performances and artistic interventions relevant to ‘Memory and Theatre’, plus receptions and gala dinners to be announced after opening.
Proposals: The organising committee welcomes abstracts and proposals strictly on the above issues. A 250-WORD abstract, along with a ONE PARAGRAPH curriculum vitae, should be submitted electronically (preferably in Word or Rich Text format) by 31 January 2015 to the scientific committee care of Professor Khalid Amine (Conference Convener). Acceptance, however, unfortunately does not include any financial support - participants are responsible for their own funding (i.e. securing grants, etc.) to pay for travel and lodging expenses. Selected conference papers will be published in a special volume upon the approval of the scientific committee. Submitters of accepted proposals will be notified within two weeks of the above deadline and all decisions of the scientific committee are final.
Simultaneous Interpreting in all Panel Sessions

Important dates & Deadlines:
khamine55@gmail.com / jaouadradouani@gmail.com
For more information on the conference please contact Prof. Khalid Amine: Khamine55@gmail.com
New Scholars’ Panel: The conference is also a home for graduate students and new scholars from different parts of the world. The establishment of an emerging Scholars’ panel invites new voices to join the debate (provided that their contributions must be relevant to the theme of this year). Up to FIVE participants will be selected for this panel, and each panelist will have ten to fifteen minutes to deliver her/his paper. Graduate students whose papers are accepted will receive free conference registration, free admission to conference luncheon, and a one-year membership in ICPS. Who is eligible? Scholars who meet the definition of ‘new scholars’ are postgraduate students writing up their PhD dissertation or post-doctoral researchers whose PhDs have been completed less than three years.
Registration Fee: 100 Euros payable in advance via Bank transfer (le centre international des études de spectacle, Banque Populaire, Tanger Ain Ktiout: 164 640 2121490077510009 61) or upon arrival. Registration includes 2 Gala Receptions, conference pack, tickets for any public concerts or site-specific performances within the conference’s public agenda, free guided tour of the Kasbah Museum, and one of the books of published proceedings from previous conferences. Since the conference is again pulling a very international public, registered attendees, participants from past conferences, and friends of ICPS will be most welcome to attend too. Women and underrepresented minorities are especially encouraged to apply.  ICPS is an Affirmative Acting/ Equal Opportunity Organization.
Conference Location: Faculty of Letters at Abdelmalek Essaâdi University (Tétouan), the Kasbah Museum (Tangier), Sahat El Kasbah, Chellah Hotel…

The Scientific Advisory Board (2015)
·      Erika Fischer-Lichte (Head of DFG Collaborative Research Centre "Performing Cultures" and Director of BMBF International Research Centre "Interweaving Cultures in Performance", Berlin, Germany
·      Christel Weiler, Professor at Institute for theatre science of the Freie Universität Berlin, Germany
·      Maria Shevtsova (Chair Professor of Drama and Theatre Arts, Co-editor of New Theatre Quarterly (Cambridge University Press), Director of Sociology of Theatre and Performance Research Group, University of London)
·      Marvin Carlson (The Sidney E. Cohn Professor of Theatre, Comparative Literature and Middle Eastern Studies at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York)
·      George F. Roberson, Adjunct Assistant Professor, Geography Human Dimensions Research Cluster, University of Massachusetts-Amherst, USA
·      Richard Gough, Senior Research Fellow and Artistic Director of the Centre for Performance Research, Department of Theatre, Film and Television Studies, Aberystwyth University, Aberystwyth, Wales
·      Zohra Makach (Professor of Theatre at Ibn Zohr University of Agadir. She holds a PhD degree in Theatre Studies from Paris III)
·      Omar Fertat (Professor of Theater in the Arab World, Department of Oriental Studies and the Far East and the Department of Performing Arts, Université Michel de Montaigne, Bordeaux 3)
·      Mohammed Samir Al-Khatib  (Professor, Ain Shams University, Egypt)
Conference Supporting Committee:
·    Mohammed Saad Zemmouri (Dean of the Faculty of Humanities at AEU)
·      Mohammed Kaouti (Independent Playwright, Morocco)
·      Carol Malt (Museum Curator, Adjunct Professor at the University of West Florida, and Ex-Director of the Art & Culture Center of Hollywood, USA)
·      Marjorie Kanter  (Author of short literary and poem-like pieces, USA)
·      Said Karimi (Professor, Faculty of Errachidiya, Moulay Ismail University)
·      Noureddine Chemlali (Director, King Fahd School of Translation)
·      Mustapha El-Ghachi (Vice Dean, Faculty of Humanites, AEU, Tetouan)
·      Abderrazzak Essrhir (Chair of the English Department at AEU)
·      Mohamed Bahjaji (Playwright and journalist, Morocco)
·      Abdelmajid El Hawass (Artist, ISADAK, Morocco)
·      Redouan El Ayadi (Professor, Abdelmalek Essaadi University)
·      Mohammed Taqqal (Regional Director of the Miniustry of Culture)
Conference Convener:
Khalid Amine (President of ICPS)
khamine55@gmail.com
Conference Co-Convener:
Younes El-Assad Ryani (Professor of Cultural Studies, Abdelmalek Essaadi University)
ra_younes@hotmail.com
Conference Assistants:
Jaouad Radouani (Theatre Scholar, member of ICPS)
jaouadradouani@gmail.com
Badreddine Charab (Administrator, ICPS)    charab09@yahoo.fr
Abdelaziz Khalili (General Secretary, ICPS)    khaliliaziz@yahoo.fr
Conference Organizing Committee:
(ICPS members & volunteers/ to be announced later)
Contact information:
Khalid Amine, Conference Convener, Residence Al Andalous  N° 11, Rue  Birr Anzaran, Tanger 90 010, Maroc Adresse: E-mail: khamine55@gmail.com, Tél/Fax: (212) 539330466, Portable: 0664596791/ Web: www.furja.ma / Bank details of ICPS, Centre International des Etudes de Spectacles, Banque populaire, Agence N° 36, Tanger Ain Ktiouet, Relevé d’identité bancaire: 164 640 212149007751000961.                                           © ICPS


[1] Carol Kino, in Rebecca Schneider, Performing Remains: Art and war in Times of Theatrical Reenactment (New York: Routledge, 2011), p.5.


—oOo—




A Neanderthal Perspective on Human Origins




—oOo—







L'instant d'amour (3)





—oOo—


Bañadoras


Bañadoras


—oOo—






L'Autre Finistère







 
—oOo—







Notas sobre Verdad y método


Mis notas sobre Verdad y Método: Fundamentos de una hermenéutica filosófica, de Hans-Georg Gadamer, tomadas varios años antes de éste que cumpliese los cien años. Re-scribdizadas ahora.


Notas sobre verdad y método de gadamer.pdf by CSGSQ





—oOo—



Sábado 11 de octubre de 2014

Zazie, Rue de la Paix




—oOo—




E. O. Wilson on Consilience in Predicting the Future





una publicación de Narratología evolucionista - Evolutionary Narratology.


—oOo—


Rocas debajo de casa

Rocas debajo de casa

—oOo—


Manchester et Liverpool (2)






—oOo—

Viernes 10 de octubre de 2014

Acción, Relato, Discurso 2.1


una publicación de Narratología evolucionista - Evolutionary Narratology.


______


También aparece este capítulo recientemente en Academia, y en varias revistas de la Social Science Research Network.



—oOo—

Casa-velero

Casa-velero


—oOo—




Garcialandia Hoy




—oOo—




L'Aigle noir (2)





—oOo—




Dos voladores


Dos voladores



—oOo—





Jueves 9 de octubre de 2014

Telling stories to ourselves

A contribution to a thread on "story" and "narrative" by William Fear et al., on the Narrative-L:

One can also "see a story" in a given situation, the moment one interprets it as having a narrative structure, as being tellable (in whatever form). Potential communication, the potential articulation of a story is "always already" narrative, because we are inherently communicative and social beings, Our ability to tell narratives, and even our ability to "see" narratives in situations or states of affairs has much to do with this sociality which is internalized, we are always in dialogue with a potential receiver, to make the story clear to him or her, even if that receiver is sometimes just another part of our brain, a role we play in self- interaction.


W.J. fear answers:

Interesting and I'll try if you can provide evidence to support your statement '...other living beings are notoriously bad at communicating
narrative patterns...'  WHat is the basis of this statement and what is the evidence for this?  All the evidence I am aware of from work with Bees up to what we falsely refer to as 'higher mammals' suggests that they are expert in communicating narrative patterns through a wide variety of means - indeed, in many cases probably through more means than humans.  So I'd be interested to know the basis of you statement and interested to see the challenges it presents to my understanding and the evidence I am aware of.

I don't want to go into huge explanations here - actually I do but the list is not really the place so I'll see if I can provide a simple example.

An acorn falls to the ground.  It germinates (inciting incident). It has a branch broken, it survives storms and droughts (rising conflict).  It becomes an adult tree (middle).  During this time nothing much happens.  It becomes older.  More droughts.  the landscape changes (conflict continues to rise).   A big storm.  (Climax).  Tree is blown over. It struggles to survive but in the end loses that struggle (resolution of events).  it decays.  little trees grow form the acorns (denouement).

The pattern is there.  There is purpose without human intervention etc etc.

Importantly, the objects leave traces that show a pattern regardless of the existence of humans and the constructs imposed upon that pattern of marks.

If someone comes along and cuts across the grain of the fallen tree they can read the sequence of events left as traces. etc. etc.

If the tree comes to an end 'before its time' so to speak then that is a case of foreclosure, which is a naturally occurring risk.

While we cannot be certain of the natural life span of all objects, and especially not of objects we assume to be non-sentient, we know that all objects have life spans and some are distinctive.

And so on and so forth but that drifts into discussion from the example and becomes extended.

—And I reply:

William, in your acorn example, most of the narrativity comes from the implied observer's viewpoint—which is ourselves, not a tree. There are natural processes involved, we can identify sequences of events, etc., but they become a story (or indeed "events" in one) from the moment there is a human mind involved. Lower minds may process simpler patterns of relationships—e.g. a bee knows nothing about the growth of trees—but at a very elementary level. Bees are indeed an interesting case, being able to convey information about objects not immediately present, but by no stretch of the term can they be said to be "narrating" their experience to other bees. Indeed the flowers etc. they refer to are in a way bodily present since the bees only indicate a direction and distance. Though I agree we need to know more about animal communication, the onus of the proof rests with you, who seem to assume animals tell stories to one another—not with me!  I think it is usually agreed that animals have feelings, emotions, intentions, etc., which are ingredients for the emergence of story, but what they lack is a sign system which allows them to articulate stories. They do have sign systems which allow them to do other things, send signals, etc.—but they can't refer to the past, or to the future, in their communications. At least I know of no experiment in animal psychology which shows an animal telling a story to another animal, or to a human. Far from being common knowledge and pervasive, what you seem to assume about animal communication is not in the least part of the consensus—at least among students of communication!


On another example of "natural narrative"—the growth rings in a tree as "a record" of a previous process:

There is a potential for story in the tree rings, but the telltale word is "record". They are not a record of anything unless they are interpreted by someone as being a record. Therefore the implied (human) observer keeps creeping in... such stories without humans are actually elements within a fully humanized (i.e. semiotized) world, which is at the very basis of their possibility of meaning.


Noam Scheindlin adds a significant contribution:

I suppose that the question is less that of the proverbial tree falling in the forest, but rather, that what constitutes a story can only be construed through the act of observation, and of delimiting the frame.  We could think of a story in the sense that Heidegger traces the etymology of the word "thing" [Ding, Res, Causa] as that which concerns humans in some respect, that which is talked about.  So, what happens (the tree creating its rings) only becomes something to talk about when a relation is perceived, when there is someone to care.  So, I would say, there's no story without someone to tell it, some narrative agency.  The story, then, is the story of this relation, of this why it is important to tell.

Narrative, and the willful act of narration, then, would be the act of telling the story.  This, it seems, is inherent in the various distinctions that have been made (though all with somewhat different emphasis) between fabula and syuzhet; story and discourse (Chatman); or the threefold distinctions that Genette and Bal make from out of this, etc.

Narration, then, would take its position as a perspective on the story, indeed one possibility of telling the story (Queneu's Exercises in Style is an excellent depiction of this).  This, it seems to me would be the case even when the narrative produces the story in the telling.  From the perspective of the narrative, the narration remains anterior/exterior to the story. 

So when someone asks you to "tell me the story of" x, rather than, "tell me the narrative of" x  (the question that Matthew Clark brought up), it is because the story is understood to be already in existence.  What one is being asked to do then is to narrate (a perspective on) a story.

This doesn't seem to me to change when the observer becomes the object of his or her observations, turning his or her acts of observations into objects: the frame between teller and told, perceiver and perceived, remains intact, as the locus of observation shifts.  One could think of homodiegetic narration as the realm where this issue is brought to the forefront, but also why such structures as Lejeune's autobiographical pact come into play.

I associated narrative with "possibility" then, because, ultimately, one can never step out of the frame of one's own story in order to tell it, and when we do, in order to try to tell it anyway, what it yields, is a possible world (see the work of Thomas Pavel and M-L. Ryan).  Thus, fiction.

De una bellota crece un arbolito




—oOo—






Miércoles 8 de octubre de 2014

Altos de Loira

Altos de Loira



—oOo—




trasmoz
Leave Not a Rack Behind

Un pasaje de Shakespeare que hemos visto hoy en clase, de La Tempestad.  Donde habla Prospero del fin del universo, que desaparecerá igual que desaparece una obra de la escena—y no quedará ni el recuerdo de nada de lo que fue—de lo que es y será. Incluidos nosotros, los que heredamos el mundo.

Our revels now are ended. These our actors,
As I foretold you, were all spirits and
Are melted into air, into thin air:
And, like the baseless fabric of this vision,
The cloud-capp'd towers, the gorgeous palaces,
The solemn temples, the great globe itself,
Ye all which it inherit, shall dissolve
And, like this insubstantial pageant faded,
Leave not a rack behind. We are such stuff
As dreams are made on, and our little life
Is rounded with a sleep.

Es también un pasaje interesante para discutir en relación con la naturaleza mental de la realidad—la realidad como realidad mental, un sistema retroalimentado de percepción, que necesita por tanto de un espectador, y no siempre lo tendrá, como un libro que no se lee.

Nought but Shows — Music for a While

—oOo—














The Beginning and the End of the Universe





—oOo—



Homenajes a Canellas, a Ynduráin, a Frutos y a Beltrán

Indices de algunos de los volúmenes de homenaje que publicó la Facultad de Filosofía y Letras de la Universidad de Zaragoza en la generación que me precedió allí—dedicados a los doctores Ángel Canellas, Francisco Ynduráin, Eugenio Frutos y Antonio Beltrán. Aún no ha dedicado la Facultad ningún homenaje a catedráticos de nuestro departamento—aunque yo mismo edité en tiempos un volumen de la Miscelánea en homenaje a Carmen Olivares.

Homenaje a Ángel Canellas:

Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Foreword by A. Beltrán. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969.*
Abbad, Francisco. "Alenza y Goya." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 7-11.* (Leonardo Alenza)
Aguelo Palacios, Pascual, and Manuel Antonio Martín Bueno. "Sobre algunos vasos cerámicos procedentes de Botorrita." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 13-18.*
Andréu Ocáriz, Juan José. "La esclavitud negra en América." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 19-39.*
Ansón, María del Carmen. "Entrada de un virrey de Aragón en Zaragoza [1601]." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 41-50.*
Armillas, José Antonio. "Viar y Jáudenes." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 51-76.* (Diplomats in USA, 1789-96).
Aubá Estremera, Natividad. "Epístola de las miujeres de Tamarite de Litera." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 77-82.* (Under Philip IV).
Barandiarán, Ignacio. "Vaso campaniforme en la cueva de los Casares." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 83-88.*
Beltrán Lloris, Miguel. "Notas sobre materiales arqueológicos en Botorrita." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 89-95.*
Beltrán Martínez, Antonio. "Las figuras naturalistas del prado del Azobue, en Aldeaquemada." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 97-99.*
Bielza de Ory, Vicente. "El modelado kárstico de la sierra de Urbasa." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 101-19, plus map.* (Navarre).
Blasco, María Concepción. "Las fusaiolas del del yacimiento ibérico de Botorrita." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 121-24.*
Blecua, José Manuel. "Versos nuevos de Fernández de Heredia." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 125-47.* (Juan Fernández de Heredia, 16th c. poet).
Bobes, María del Carmen. "Los cambios semánticos." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 149-76.*
Borobio Enciso, María Pilar. "Estudio sobre la demografía de Cuenca: 1960-65." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 177-83.*
Borrás Gualis, Gonzalo Máximo. "Pintores aragoneses del siglo XV." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 185-99.*
Bosch Vilá, Jacinto. "Una adición a la genalogía de la familia beréber de los Banu Razin." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 201-8. (Albarracín).*
Bosque Maurel, Joaquín. "Minería y agricultural tradicional en el Marquesado del Zenete." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 209-26. (Granada).*
Cañada Sauras, Javier A. "La iglesia parroquial de Cretas." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 227-36.* (Cretas, Teruel).
Carnicer, Ramón. "La Frenología en Zaragoza." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 237-48.*
Carreras, Juan José. "Una biografía de Marx." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 249-58.*
Corona, Carlos E. "El poder real y los motines de 1766." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 259-77.*
Falcón Pérez, María Isabel. "Ordenanzas municipales de Laguna de Cameros." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 279-303.*
Fatás Cabeza, Guillermo. "Monedas griegas en el Museo Provincial de Zaragoza." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 305-9.*
Fernández Cuervo, Carmen. "Las joyas de adorno personal en inventarios zaragozanos del siglo XVI." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 311-27.*
Fernández Serrano, Francisco. "Un poeta exspañol del siglo XVI: Hernando Afrodiseo de Aragón." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 329-34.*
Fernández Teno, Nazareth. "Algunas noticias de un inventario real." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 335-53.*  (Juan II, c. 1470).
Ferrer Benimeli, José Antonio. "El Conde de Aranda, primer Secretario de Estado." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 355-78.*
Ferrer Regales, Manuel and Elena Uriz Echalecu. "Una experiencia de metodología activa en la enseñanza universitaria." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 379-90.*
Floriano, Antonio C. "Tres documentos del infante don Alfonso, titulado Alfonso XII (1465-1468)." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 391-410.*
Floristán, Alfredo. "La población de Navarra en el quinquenio 1960-1965." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 411-20.
Fribourg, Jeanine. "Sur l'application des méthodes ethnologiques dans l'étude des sociétés modernes." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 421-33.*
Frutos Cortés, Eugenio. "Estructura unitaria de la 'naturaleza humana'." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 435-42.*
Frutos Mejías, Luisa María. "Los cultivos forrajeros en el Ebro medio." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 443-57 plus map.*
Galindo Romeo, Pascual. "Inventarios y libros (1340-1540). Síntesis bibliográfica." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 459-502.*
García Manrique, E. "Sobre el turismo español." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 503-30.*
Gay Gacén, Jerónimo. "Los depósitos cuaternarios en la confluencia del Esera-Isábena." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 531-40, plus map.*
Gil, Ildefonso Manuel. "Luis López Allué, escritor aragonés." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 541-52.*
Gómez de Valenzuela, Manuel. "Tres ermitas románicas pirenaicas." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 553-62.*
González Antón, Luis. "Aportación al estudio de la minoría de Alfonso XI de Castilla." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 563-84.*
Higueras Arnal, Antonio. "La agricultura de regadío en España." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 585-630.*
Jiménez Jiménez, María Rosa. "Sobre el gremio de curtidores en Barcelona." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 631-40.*
Lacarra, José María. "En torno a los orígenes del reino de Pamplona." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 641-70.*
Ledesma Rubio, María Luisa. "La Hacienda Municipal de Zaragoza en el año 1442." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 671-87.*
López González, Juan-Jaime. "Regocijos públicos en la Zaragoza de 1782 a 1792." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 689-93.*
MaDermott, Dorieann. "Smelfungus and Yorick." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 707-19.*
Martín Duque, Angel J. "Concesión de la feria de Graus por Pedro II de Aragón (1201)." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 721-24.*
Martínez Cordón, Ana María. "Los sondeos petrolíferos en España." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 725-38.*
Mateu Ibars, María Dolores. "El 'Repertori' de San Vicente de la Roqueta, de 1763." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 739-44.*
Mateu y Llopis, Felipe. "Sello y documentos del arcipreste de Morella Domingo Bell Tall, de 1335." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 745-50.*
Mensua, Salvador. "El modelado de La Muela de Zaragoza." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 751-62.*
Miralbés Bedera, María Rosario, and María Pilar de Torres Luna. "Sobre la función comercial de Santiago y su área de influencia." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 763-71, plus map and photographs.* (Santiago de Compostela).
Monge, Felix. "Sobre la 'lengua aragonesa'." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 771-83.*
Moreno del Rincón, Encarnación B. "Iglesia parroquial de San Miguel, Ibdes." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 785-93.*
Moya Valgañón, José Gabriel. "Sobre Bernal de Forment y Natuera Borgoñón." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 795-804, plus illustrations.* (Artists, 16th c.).
Olaechea, Rafael. "La relación 'amistosa' entre F. A. de Lorenzana y J. N. de Azara." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 805-50.*
Oliván Baile, Franisco. "Una crónica desconocida de Fernando de Antequera." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 851-74.* (Fernando I, Crowned in Zaragoza, 1414).
Olivares, Carmen. "El lenguaje hipnótico de la 'gran sociedad'." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 875-85.*
Pedraza Prades, María Dolores. "Un sermón especial en un auto de fe zaragozano." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 887-91.* (1486).
Requejo Díaz de Espada, Elena. "Un retablo de la Seo de Zaragoza." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 893-902.*
Sánchez Sanz, María del Pilar. "Un retablo de la iglesia de Luceni." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 903-7.*
San Vicente, Ángel. "Sobre algunos calígrafos del Bajo Renacimiento en Zaragoza." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 909-51, plus illustrations.*
Soláns Castro, Manuela. "Notas sobre desarrollo urbano de Monzón." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 953-62.*
Tolosa, María Teresa. "El obispado de Nueva Orleáns y su clero." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 963-70.*
Torralba Soriano, Federico. "Tres versiones de una iconografía." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 971-73, plus illustrations.* (Christ tied to the column).
Ubieto Arteta, Antonio. "La 'Tercera Crónica General' y Zurita." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 975-77.*
Valenzuela Fuertes, María del Carmen. "La explotación del territorio ansotano en el pasado." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 979-95, plus map.*
Ynduráin, Francisco. "Sobre la función fática del lenguaje." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 997-1001.*
Yrache Esteban, Luis. "Sobre Cien años de soledad y el lenguaje novelesco." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 1003-8.*


Homenaje a Francisco Yndurain

Aguirre, José María. "El mundo 'tetradimensional absurdo' de Miguel Labordeta." In Homenaje a Francisco Yndurain. Foreword by Antonio Beltrán. Zaragoza: Universidad de Zaragoza, Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, 1972. 9-22.*
Alvar, Manuel, and Fernando de la Granja. "Apostillas lingüísticas al 'Fecho de Buluqiya'." In Homenaje a Francisco Yndurain. Foreword by Antonio Beltrán. Zaragoza: Universidad de Zaragoza, Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, 1972. 23-40.*
Beltrán, Antonio. "Notas sobre literatura popular en Aragón." In Homenaje a Francisco Yndurain. Foreword by Antonio Beltrán. Zaragoza: Universidad de Zaragoza, Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, 1972. 41-46.*
Blecua, José Manuel. "Las Rimas de don Tomás Sivori, caballero genovés." In Homenaje a Francisco Yndurain. Foreword by Antonio Beltrán. Zaragoza: Universidad de Zaragoza, Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, 1972. 47-64.*
Buesa Oliver, Tomás. "Léxico vasco relativo al tiempo en la Navarra Nordoriental (Partido de Aóiz)." In Homenaje a Francisco Yndurain. Foreword by Antonio Beltrán. Zaragoza: Universidad de Zaragoza, Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, 1972. 65-106.*
Canellas López, Ángel. "Un documento soriano romanceado: Infeudación del castillo de Alcozar hacia 1156." In Homenaje a Francisco Yndurain. Foreword by Antonio Beltrán. Zaragoza: Universidad de Zaragoza, Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, 1972. 107-29.*
Frutos, Eugenio. "Pensamiento, expresión y comunicación." In Homenaje a Francisco Yndurain. Foreword by Antonio Beltrán. Zaragoza: Universidad de Zaragoza, Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, 1972. 129-36.*
Gil, Ildefonso-Manuel. "Estructuras concéntricas en las Rimas de Gustavo Adolfo Bécquer." In Homenaje a Francisco Yndurain. Foreword by Antonio Beltrán. Zaragoza: Universidad de Zaragoza, Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, 1972. 137-46.*
Giménez Resano, Gaudioso. "Lenguaje y lenguaje poético (a propósito de la oda tercera 'A Felipe Ruiz' de Fray Luis de León." In Homenaje a Francisco Yndurain. Foreword by Antonio Beltrán. Zaragoza: Universidad de Zaragoza, Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, 1972. 147-62.*
Guardiola, Conrado. "El Abencerraje y la Hermosa Jarifa: Estudio de su estructura." In Homenaje a Francisco Yndurain. Foreword by Antonio Beltrán. Zaragoza: Universidad de Zaragoza, Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, 1972. 163-74.*
Lacarra, José María. "Un nuevo texto foral navarro-aragonés." In Homenaje a Francisco Yndurain. Foreword by Antonio Beltrán. Zaragoza: Universidad de Zaragoza, Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, 1972. 175-200.*
Lázaro Carreter, Fernando. "Función poética y verso libre." In Homenaje a Francisco Yndurain. Foreword by Antonio Beltrán. Zaragoza: Universidad de Zaragoza, Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, 1972. 201-16.*
Mainer, José-Carlos. "Aliadofilia y juegos florales." In Homenaje a Francisco Yndurain. Foreword by Antonio Beltrán. Zaragoza: Universidad de Zaragoza, Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, 1972. 217-28.*
Monge, Félix. "Sufijos españoles para la designación de 'golpe'." In Homenaje a Francisco Yndurain. Foreword by Antonio Beltrán. Zaragoza: Universidad de Zaragoza, Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, 1972. 229-48.*
Pérez Gállego, Cándido. "El arranque de A Farewell to Arms de Hemingway." In Homenaje a Francisco Yndurain. Foreword by Antonio Beltrán. Zaragoza: Universidad de Zaragoza, Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, 1972. 249-48.*
Pinillos, José Luis. "Tipos de personalidad y estilos connotativos." In Homenaje a Francisco Yndurain. Foreword by Antonio Beltrán. Zaragoza: Universidad de Zaragoza, Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, 1972. 259-66.*
San Vicente, Ángel. "El teatro en Zaragoza en tiempos de Lope de Vega." In Homenaje a Francisco Yndurain. Foreword by Antonio Beltrán. Zaragoza: Universidad de Zaragoza, Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, 1972. 267-361.*




 Homenaje a Eugenio Frutos:

Estudios en homenaje al Dr. Eugenio Frutos Cortés. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1977.
Beltrán, Antonio. "Eugenio Frutos Cortés." In Estudios en homenaje al Dr. Eugenio Frutos Cortés. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1977. 7-10.*
"Publicaciones de Eugenio Frutos Cortés." In Estudios en homenaje al Dr. Eugenio Frutos Cortés. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1977. 11-20.*
Alvar, Manuel. "Un rasgo aragonés: la agudeza de conceptos." In Estudios en homenaje al Dr. Eugenio Frutos Cortés. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1977. 21-29.*
Bielza de Ory, Vicente. "La ampliación conceptual y metodológica de la geografía económica en las últimas décadas." In Estudios en homenaje al Dr. Eugenio Frutos Cortés. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1977. 31-49.*
Buesa Oliver, Tomás. "Aspectos de la Universidad de Zaragoza durante la primera guerra carlista." In Estudios en homenaje al Dr. Eugenio Frutos Cortés. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1977. 51-79.*
Canellas López, Ángel. "La capilla de la Anunciación de la parroquial de Longares, fundación del arzobispo Don Diego de Escolano." In Estudios en homenaje al Dr. Eugenio Frutos Cortés. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1977. 81-92.*
Corona, Carlos E. "Los sucesos en Badajoz, el 7 de abril, y en Baza, el 25 de mayo de 1766." In Estudios en homenaje al Dr. Eugenio Frutos Cortés. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1977. 93-104.*
Díaz-Regañón López, José Mª. "Apostillas a los apéndices VIII, XII y XIII de la edición de Apolodoro de Frazer en la 'Loeb Classical Library'." In Estudios en homenaje al Dr. Eugenio Frutos Cortés. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1977. 105-17.* (J. G. Frazer).
Ferrer Benimeli, José A. "La masonería bonapartista en Cataluña: La Logia 'Napoléon le Grand' de Gerona (1811-1813) y la de 'Les Amis de la Réunion' de Figureras (1812-1813)." In Estudios en homenaje al Dr. Eugenio Frutos Cortés. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1977. 119-44.*
Frutos Mejías, eugenio. "Notas sobre la teoría de los elementos en el Timeo de Platón." In Estudios en homenaje al Dr. Eugenio Frutos Cortés. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1977. 145-63.*
Lacarra Ducay, Mª Carmen. "Cuatro fragmentos del retablo de Blesa no conocidos." In Estudios en homenaje al Dr. Eugenio Frutos Cortés. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1977. 165-76.*
Láscaris Comneno, Constantino. "Los perros filósofos y los filósofos mordedores." In Estudios en homenaje al Dr. Eugenio Frutos Cortés. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1977. 177-85.* (Plato).
Lázaro Carreter, Fernando. "Eugenio Frutos, nuestro maestro." In Estudios en homenaje al Dr. Eugenio Frutos Cortés. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1977. 187-93.*
Ménsua, Salvador, and Manuela Soláns. "Posibilidades metodológicas de la representación cartográfica de los espacios cultivados: El modelo de Zaragoza." In Estudios en homenaje al Dr. Eugenio Frutos Cortés. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1977. 195-202 plus map.*
Monge, Félix. "Fondo y forma en Valle-Inclán." In Estudios en homenaje al Dr. Eugenio Frutos Cortés. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1977. 203-12.*
Olaechea, R. "Contribución al estudio  del 'Motín contra Esquilache' (1766)." In Estudios en homenaje al Dr. Eugenio Frutos Cortés. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1977. 213-347.*
Pérez Gállego, Cándido. "La destrucción del símbolo." In Estudios en homenaje al Dr. Eugenio Frutos Cortés. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1977. 349-66.*
San Vicente, Ángel. "Acotaciones documentadas para la historia del arte en cinco villas durante el siglo XVI." In Estudios en homenaje al Dr. Eugenio Frutos Cortés. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1977. 367-445.*




Homenaje a Antonio Beltrán

Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Foreword by Vicente Camarena García. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986.*  

Camarena Badía, Vicente. "Antonio Beltrán Martínez." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 7-10.* 
"Bibliografía del Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 11-27.* 
Pellicer Corellano, F., J. L. Peña Monne and M. J. Ibáñez Marcellán. "Estudio geomorfológico del yacimiento de Burrén y Burrena (Depresión del Ebro): Génesis del relieve y evolución holocena." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 33-45.* 
Bielza de Ory, V., and S. Escolano Utrilla. "La estructura y localización de los asentamientos en España." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 47-59.* 
Clottes, Jean, Jean-Pierre Giraud, and Christian Servelle. "Un galet gravé badegoulien à Vers (Lot)." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 61-84.* 
Barrière, Cl. "Figures animales transformées dans la grotte de Combarelles." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 85-91.* 
Roussot, Alain. "La figuration humaine de Bernifal (Dordogne)." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 93-101.* 
Moure-Romanillo, Alfonso, and Manuel González-Morales. "Los grabados de los abrigos de El Perro y San Carlos (Santoña, Cantabria)." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 103-14.* 
Baldellou, V., A. Painaud, and Mª J. Calvo. "Dos nuevos covachos con pinturas naturalistas en el Vero (Huesca)." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 115-33.* 
Casado López, María Pilar. "Dispersión de la pintura y grabado rupestre en América." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 135-48.* 
Vallespí Pérez, Enrique. "Culturas de las graveras y comienzos del achelense ibérico." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 149-57.* 
Montes Ramírez, Mª Lourdes, and Carlos Mazo Pérez. "El musteriense y el método Bordes: Algunas reflexiones." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 159-70.* 
Galindo Ortiz de Landazuri. "Los conjuntos líticos de Montón y Miedes (Zaragoza): Nuevas aportaciones al conocimiento del Paleolítico de la Cuenca del Jalón." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 171-90.* 
Hernández Paricio, Francisco. "Sobre el lenguaje en el hombre de Neanderthal." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 191-203.* 
Utrilla Miranda, Pilar. "La varilla 'pseudoexcisa' de Aitbitarte IV y sus paralelos franceses." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 205-25.* 
Delibes de Castro, Germán, Montserrat Alonso Díez, and Rafael Galván Morales. "El miradero: Un enterramiento colectivo tardoneolítico de Villanueva de los Caballesos (Valladolid)." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 227-36.* 
Andrés Rupérez, Teresa. "Sobre cronología dolménica: País Vasco, Navarra y Rioja." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 237-65.* 
Pérez Arrondo, Carlos L. "Algunos datos para el estudio de la Edad de los Metales en el Valle del Ebro Medio." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 267-83.* 
Picazo Millán, Jesús V. "Aproximación al conocimiento de los yacimientos líticos del Jiloca Medio - Campo Romanos." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 285-328.* 
Pellicer Catalán, Manuel. "Luis Siret, promotor de la arqueología hispana." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 329-38.* 
Gil-Mascarrel Bosca, Milagro, and Alonso Rodríguez Díaz. "Un enterramiento en Cista en Villafranca de los Barros (Badajoz)." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 339-46.* 
Jimeno Martínez, Alfredo. "La cueva de 'El Peñal' de Valdegeña (Soria): Nuevas bases para su estudio." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 347-57.* 
Blasco Bosqued, Mª Concepción. "Panorama general del Bronce Final y Primera Edad del Hierro en el área nororiental de la submeseta sur." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 359-72.* 
Rodanés, J. Mª, and J. L. Royo. "Representaciones zoomorfas en la cerámica del Bronce final y primera Edad del Hierro en el valle medio del Ebro." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 373-87.* 
Eiroa, Jorge Juan. "Una aproximación al modelo urbano del Bajo Aragón protohistórico." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 389-408.* 
Atrián Jordán, Purificación. "El Cabezo de la Cisterna de Alba (Teruel). Un yacimiento de la primera edad del hierro." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 409-28.* 
Delporte, H. "Le Musée des Antiquités Nationales de Sant-Germain-en-Laye." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 429-38.* 
Anati, Emmanuel. "Har Karkom: E  problemi cronologici ed esegetici." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 439-51.* 
Hernández Vera, José Antonio, and Juan José Murillo Ramos. "La metalurgia celtibérica: Proyecto de investigación." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 453-61.* 
Fernández Miranda, Manuel. "La estela de las herencias (Toledo)." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 463-76.* 
Almagro-Gorbea, Martín. "Aportación inicial a la paleodemografía ibérica." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 477-93.* 
Beltrán Lloris. "Introducción a las bases arqueológicas del valle medio del río Ebro en relación con la etapa prerromana." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 495-527.* 
Burillo Mozota, Francisco. "Sobre el territorio de los lusones, belos y tirios en el siglo II a.de C." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 529-49.* 
Domínguez Arranz, Mª Almudena. "Un estudio sobre la iberización de la provincia de Huesca." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 551-66.* 
Cuadrado, Emeterio. "El problema de los restos escultóricos de las necrópolis ibéricas." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 567-87.* 
Tovío Sarnago, Soledad. "Motivos zoomorfos en la cerámica ibérica de la provincia de Teruel." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 589-99.* 
Medrano Marqués, Manuel María, and Mª Antonia Díaz Sanz. "Inscripción ibérica sobre vasija tipo 'ilduradin' hallada en Contrebia Belaisca (Botorrita, Zaragoza)." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 601-11.* 
Cisneros Cunchillos, Miguel. "Canteras y materiales de construcción de Los Bañales (Uncastillo, Zaragoza)." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 613-19.* 
Magallón Botaya, Mª de los Ángeles. "Cronología de la red viaria del Convento Caesaraugustano según los miliarios." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 621-31.* 
Martín Bueno, Manuel. "Gerasa (Jordania): Nuevas perspectivas." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 633-47.* 
Balil, Alberto. "Las representaciones de camélidos en la industria artística romana." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 649-55.* 
Blázquez, J. M., and M. P. García-Gelabert. "Castulo (Jaén): Ensayo de análisis ambiental." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 657-65.* 
Schrader, Carlos ."La investigación histórica en Herodoto." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 667-76.* 
Fatás, Guillermo. "Para un Índice Toponímico Hispánico (ITH): Índices de Avieno, Estrabón (III), Plinio (III-IV), Ptolomeo y los textos literarios." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 677-730.* 
Marco Simón, F. "El dios céltico Lug y el santuario de Peñalba de Villastar." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 731-59.* 
Roldán Hervás, José Manuel. "Los reclutamientos romanos en el valle del Ebor, en época republicana." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 761-69.* 
Cabanes Pecourt, Mª Desamparados. "Escritura romana en Valencia." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 781-88.* 
Sancho Rocher, Laura. "La Lex Publilia del año 471 a.C., las tribus rústicas y la constitución de Servio Tulio." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 789-98.* 
Martínez López, Julia. "'Sponsio' y 'Nexum': Dos instituciones clave en los problemas crediticios de los primeros siglos republicanos." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 799-808.* 
Pina Polo, Francisco. "El modelo agrícola catoniano." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 809-17.* 
Villacampa Rubio, Mª Angustias. "Consideraciones sobre la Vita Alex. Sev. 21, 3-5: La supuesta reforma del status de los prefectos del pretorio y la conocida tendencia prosenatorial de la Historia Augusta." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 819-32.* 
Escribano Paño, María Victoria. "En torno a una ley de Graciano contra la herejía (Cth. XVI, 5, 4)." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 833-49.* 
Amaré Tafalla, Mª Teresa. "Numismática y cerámica romanas: Relaciones iconográficas." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 851-58.* 
Villaronga, L. "Denarioa forrado híbrido, testimonio para el origen del denario ibérico de Sesars." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 859-61.* 
Chaves Tristán, Francisca. "Hallazgo de monedas en Riotinto (Huelva)." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 863-72.* 
Lomba Fuentes, Joaquín. "Physis y mímesis en la filosofía del arte griego." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 873-87.* 
Beltrán Lloris, Francisco. "Sobre la función de la moneda ibérica e hispano-romana." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 889-914.* 
Tarradell, M. "Las cecas ibéricas, ¿economía o política?" In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 915-17.*  (Coins).
Iso, José Javier. "Más sobre Aristóteles, Poética (Caps. 9 y 13)." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 919-26.* 
Yagüe Ferrer, Mª Isabel. "El retrato femenino en Salustio." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 927-35.* 
Rodón, E. "El diálogo de Medea y Jasón en la tragedia de Séneca." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 937-49.* 
Domínguez, Antonio. "El Roman de Renard y la cuentística española." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 953-67.* 
Mateu y Llopis, Felipe. "Documentos monetarios de Jaime I del Ms. Real 9, del Archivo de la Corona de Aragón. De la moneda de los reals de Valencia y las tabule campsorum de 1247." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 969-81.* 
Mezquíriz Irujo, Mª Ángeles. "Diversas formas cerámicas del siglo XV procedentes de 'El desolado de Rada' (Navarra)." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 983-89.* 
Falcón Pérez, María Isabel. "Notas en torno a la cofradía de cuchilleros de Zaragoza. Las ordenanzas de 1413." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 991-97.* 
Ledesma, Mª Luisa. "Acerca de las ordalías y del duelo judicial 'de escudo y bastón' en el aragón medieval." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 999-1006.* 
Borrás Gualis, Gonzalo M. "El palacio mudéjar de los arzobispos de Zaragoza." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 1007-14.* 
Ubieto Arteta, Antonio. "Las varraquas de los jaqueses y les barraques dels reals." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 1015-18.* 
Sarasa Sánchez, Esteban. "La arqueología industrial por un nuevo conocimeinto histórico." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 1019-23.* 
Sesma Muñoz, J. Angel. "La moneda jaquesa y la emisión de Aragoneses de plata." Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 1029-39.* 
Monterde Albiac, Cristina, and Mª Rosa Gutiérrez Iglesias. "La hacienda municipal zaragozana en el año 1516." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 1041-59.* 
Onega, Susana. "España vista por un viajero inglés a mediados del siglo XVI." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 1061-72.*  (Andrew Boorde).
Solano Camón, Enrique. "Xenofobia antifrancesa en Aragón: Discrepancia política y confluencia de intereses en el año 1639." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 1073-83.* 
Redondo Veintemillas, Guillermo. "La moneda 'perulera' en Aragón (1650-1653): Notas y documentos." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 1085-1116.* 
Orol Pernas, Antonio. "La Real Casa de Moneda de Trujillo." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 1117-32.* 
Mainer, José-Carlos. "Antropología cultural y mala literatura: El entretenido (1673) de Antonio Sánchez Tórtoes." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 1133-52.* 
Armillas, José A., and M. Isabel Molinos. "Sátira política en Zaragoza durante la Guerra de Sucesión (1707)." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 1153-67.* 
Gonzalvo Vallespí, José Carlos. "Actos de posesión y ceremonial de recibimiento en el ducado de Híjar y condado de Belchite a fines del Antiguo Régimen." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 1169-76.* 
Pueyo Colomina, Pilar. "Suscripciones y signos notariales en la parroquia de Castejón de Valdejasa (Siglos XVI-XIX)." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 1177-91.* 
Cacho, Maite. "Un dance aragonés de 1723." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 1193-1201.* 
Albiac Blanco, Mª Dolores. "Vida e ilustración: Dos documentos desconocidos de Antonio Arteta (1745-Ca 1813)." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 1203-16.* 
Solano Costa, Fernando. "El ejército de la monarquía durante los tiempos modernos." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 1217-30.* 
Val Álvaro, José Francisco. "Sobre lengua e historia en el Catálogo de las Lenguas de Lorenzo Hervás." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 1231-39.* 
Enguita Utrilla, José María. "Algunas consideraciones fonéticas sobre las coplas de la jota aragonesa." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 1241-58.* 
Martín Zorraquino, Mª Antonia. "Sobre algunas expresiones fijas con nombres de animal en el español coloquial moderno." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 1259-63.* 




—oOo—





More on the Same


una publicación de Narratología evolucionista - Evolutionary Narratology.


—oOo—





See me at the Psychology Wiki


No hay muchos enlaces de filólogos españoles, ni extranjeros, en este artículo introductorio o visión general del área de la filología—pero allí estoy yo. También en "Lingüística", por cierto.

http://psychology.wikia.com/wiki/Philology


—oOo—





Martes 7 de octubre de 2014

Vista de Sálvora

Vista de Sálvora


—oOo—




Kate Bush at the BBC




—oOo—






211 en Alianzo



211 en Alianzo


Viene a ser que estoy en el 0,75 % de los primeros puestos. No mal.
Lunes 6 de octubre de 2014


—oOo—






De camino a casa desde el pueblo


Camino a casa desde el pueblo





HENRY VAUGHAN (and Thomas Vaughan)


From The Oxford Companion to English Literature, ed. Margaret Drabble.

VAUGHAN, Henry (1621-95), born at Newton-upon-Usk, Breconshire, the eldest son of a Welsh gentleman, Thomas Vaughan of Tretower, and his wife Denise. Henry's twin brother Thomas (below) became a controversial 'natural magician'. Probably in 1628 a third brother William was born. Henry and Thomas were brought up bilingual in Welsh and English, tutred by Matthew Herbert, a noted schoolmaster at Llangattock. By May 1638 Thomas was at Jesus College, Oxford, and Henry almost certainly accompanied him, though his residence is not recorded. Around 1640 Henry probably went to London to study law, though it is not known which Inn admitted him. He may have come within the orbit of the literary set of which Jonson had been the leader. He returned to Breconshie, probably at the outbreak of the Civil War, and after a spell as clerk to Sir Marmaduke Lloyd, chief justice of the sessions, he saw military service on the Royalist side. About 1646 he married Catherine Wise. They had a son, Thomas, and three daughters. His wooing of Catherine is apparently recalled in the poem 'Upon the Priory Grove' printed in Poems with the tenth Satire of Juvenal Englished (1646), his first collection. His second, Olor Iscanus (The Swan Of Usk), has a dedication bearing the date 1647, but was not published until 1651. The poems in these two volumes are almost wholly secular, including fashionable love verses and translations from *Ovid, Ausonius, *Boethius, and the Polish Jesuit Latin poet Casimir Sarbiewski (1594-1640). There is little in them that anticipates the great religious poetry of Vaughan's next volume, Silex Scintillans (Flashing Flint, 1650). The poems suggest that a profound spiritual experience, connected with the death of his brother William in 1648 and the defeat of the Royalist cause, accounted for the despair and renewal which inspired the composition of Silex. Further devotional works followed: The Mount of Olives, or Solitary Devotions (1652) and Flores Solitudinis (1654), which consists of three pious prose trnslations and a life of St Paulinus of Nola. In 1655 appeared the second edition of Silex Scintillans, with a second part added, and also a translation of the Hermetical Physick of Henry Nollius. A translation of The Chymists Key by the same author followed in 1657. Vaughan's first wife having died, he married her younger sister Elizabeth, probably in 1655. They had a son, Henry, and three daughters. According to a letter he sent to *Aubrey in 1673 he had by that date been practising physic 'for many years with good success'. There is no record of a medical degree. His brother Thomas died in 1666, and in 1678 Thalia Rediviva, containing poems by both twins, was published. His later life was marred by litigious feuds between his first and second families.



Vaughan's religious poetry is uneven, but its best moments, like the start of 'The World' ('I saw Eternity the other night'), have a quality which is wholly distinctive, and which has prevailed with critics to class him as a 'mystic': his lyrics ('The bird', 'The Water-Fall', 'The Timber') show a sense of man's unity with and God's love of creaturely life, and he believed (with his brother) that nature would be resurrected at the end of time, and that even stones had feeling. He was seized with the idea of childish innocence, and the child's recollections of prenatal glory. He writer, in 'The Retreat', of his own 'Angel infancy', when he would pause on clouds and flowers and see in them 'Some shadows of eternity'. He acknowledged, in the preface to the second part of Silex Scintillans, his great debt to G. *Herbert, 'whose holy life and verse gained many pious Converts (of whom I am the least)'. Vaughan's fascination with hermeticism, and particularly with the idea of sympathetic bonds uniting microcosm and macrocosm, is clear in his poems, many of which share ideas and even phrases with his brother Thomas's treatises. On the title pages of Olor Iscanus and Silex Scintillans Vaughan calls himself a 'Silurist', presumably because his native Brecon was anciently inhabited by the British tribe of Silures.

Works, ed. L. C. Martin (2nd ed. 1957); Complete Poems, ed. Alan Rudrum (1976); F. E. Hutchinson, Henry Vaughan: A Life and Interpretation (1947; corrected repr. 1971); S. Davies, Henry Vaughan (1995). The Vaughan Society was founded in 1994 and its journal, Scintilla, is edited by Anne *Cluysenaar.

Metaphysical religious poetry


____

(Observe the two Henrys, the two Thomases, the two brothers, their three sisters each, and the brother-cousins...  )


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THOMAS TRAHERNE


From The Oxford Companion to English Literature, ed. Margaret Drabble.



Traherne, Thomas (1637-74), son of a shoemaker in Hereford. It seems possible that both his parents died while he and his brother Philip were infants, and the boys were brought up by a wealthy innkeeper, Philip Traherne, twice mayor of Hereford. They evidently had a good education, but no record exists of their attending Hereford Cathedral School. Thomas went up to Brasenose College, Oxford, as a commoner in March 1653, and took his BA in October 1656. In 1657 the parliamentary commissioners appointed him rector of Credenhill, Herefordshire, but he seems not to have resided there until 1661. He was ordained in 1660, and the following year took his Oxford MA. At Credenhill he joined the religious circle centring on Susanna Hopton at Kington, for whom he was to write the Centuries. During this period he evidently travelled to Oxford to work on Roman Forgeries in the Bodleian. Probably in recognition of this work he gained his BD in 1669, and also his appointment the same year as chaplain to Sir Orlando Bridgeman, lord keeper of the great seal, which necessitated his moving to London. He was buried at Teddington.

Traherne led a 'single and devout life', according to A. *Wood. He left five houses in Hereford in trust for the poor people of All Saints parish. He told *Aubrey that he had visions, seeing, on one occasion, the phantom of an apprentice who was asleep in the same house, and on another a basket of fruit sailing in the air over his bed. Traherne's Centuries and many of his poems were discovered in a notebook (now in the Bodleian) which was picked up for a few pence on a London bookstall in the winter of 1896-7 by W. T. Brooke. Bertram Dobell identified Traherne as the author, and edited the Poetic Works (1903) and the Centuries of Meditations (1908). More poems, prepared for publication by Traherne's brother Philip as 'Poems of Felicity', were discovered in a British Museum manuscript and published by H. I. Bell in 1910. A further manuscript of Select Mediatations has since come to light, and is in the collection of the late J. M. Osborn. In his lifetime Traherne published Roman Forgeries (1673), which exposes the falsifying of ecclesiastical documents by the Church of Rome, concentrating in the mid-9th-century collection known as the 'False Decretals' which had, in fact, already been decisively discredited by several 16th-century scholars. His Christian Ethicks (1675) was prepared for the press before he died. But his major achievement comprises the Centuries,  the poems and the Thanksgivings, written in exuberant, unconventional verse, and at times foreshadowing *Whitman, which appeared in 1699. He expresses a rapturous joy in creation unmatched by any other 17th-century writer, and his memories, in the Centuries, of his own early intuitions are the first convincing depiction of childhood experience in English literature. He is also among the first English writers to respond imaginatively to new ideas about infinite space, and at times virtually equates infinite space with God. The boundless potential of man's mind and spirit is his recurrent theme, as is the need for adult man to regain the wonder and simplicity of the child. In both, his thought is influenced by *Neoplatonism, especially by the Hermetic books.

Centuries, Poems and Thanksgivings, ed. H. M. Margoliouth (2 vols, 1958); Christian Ethics, ed. C. L. Marks and G. R. Guffey (1968); G. Wade, Thomas Traherne (1944); K. W. Salter, Thomas Traherne, Mystic and Poet (1964).

"Metaphysical" Religious Poetry: Herbert, Crashaw, and Vaughan

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The Legend of Sleepy Hollow





—oOo—





Domingo 5 de octubre de 2014

The Kate Bush Story

(BBC, 2014)






—oOo—

El Gran Teatro del Mundo

—y el pequeño teatro de la mente:

Inauguro mi blog número... 15, y me quedo corto. Apenas doy abasto a actualizarlos, pero hacemos lo que podemos y lo que no podemos.  Al igual que mi blog sobre The Story in All Stories, lo abro en Storify, y versará éste sobre teatro y teatralidad, el teatro del mundo, sobre echarle teatro a la vida, y sobre dramatismos psicológicos varios.







—oOo—






Mi sombra en una cala

Mi sombra en una cala

—oOo—






La evolución del dividuo social y de los espacios públicos



una publicación de Narratología evolucionista - Evolutionary Narratology.


También en ResearchGate: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/266393290

— y en diversas revistas de la Social Science Research Network, por ejemplo (Metafísico estoy) en la de Metafísica.


En la web de HERAF


—oOo—


Ven que te arreglo, O'Neil



Ven que te arreglo, O'Neil


—oOo—







Sábado 4 de octubre de 2014

Jokerman (3)




—oOo—






Erving Goffman: The Dramaturgical Approach



—oOo—


Artur Mas desobedece al Constitucional





—oOo—







Viernes 3 de octubre de 2014

The Quiet Bay

The Quiet Bay




—oOo—



Introduction to Theorizing Narrativity




una publicación de Narratología evolucionista - Evolutionary Narratology.


Reference Info: Theorizing Narrativity. Ed. John Pier and José Angel García Landa. (Narratologia, 12). Berlin and New York: Walter de Gruyter, 2008.



http://papers.ssrn.com/abstract=2500699


It appears under the following date (Date posted: September 26, 2014)   in the following SSRN eJournals:



eJournal Classifications
CSN Subject Matter eJournals
                          
LIT Subject Matter eJournals
    
PRN Subject Matter eJournals
             
PRN Subject Matter eJournals
             




—oOo—






Jueves 2 de octubre de 2014

Andarina

Andarina


—oOo—



Vladimir Nabokov and Lolita (BBC, Stephen Smith)





Georgie Dann - Una paloma blanca



—oOo—


Geoffrey Chaucer - The Canterbury Tales





Geoffrey Chaucer (/ˈtʃɔːsər/; c. 1343 -- 25 October 1400), known as the Father of English literature, is widely considered the greatest English poet of the Middle Ages and was the first poet to have been buried in Poet's Corner of Westminster Abbey. While he achieved fame during his lifetime as an author, philosopher, alchemist and astronomer, composing a scientific treatise on the astrolabe for his ten year-old son Lewis, Chaucer also maintained an active career in the civil service as a bureaucrat, courtier and diplomat. Among his many works, which include The Book of the Duchess, the House of Fame, the Legend of Good Women and Troilus and Criseyde, he is best known today for The Canterbury Tales. Chaucer is a crucial figure in developing the legitimacy of the vernacular, Middle English, at a time when the dominant literary languages in England were French and Latin.

The Canterbury Tales is a collection of stories written in Middle English by Geoffrey Chaucer at the end of the 14th century. The tales (mostly written in verse although some are in prose) are told as part of a story-telling contest by a group of pilgrims as they travel together on a journey from Southwark to the shrine of Saint Thomas Becket at Canterbury Cathedral. The prize for this contest is a free meal at the Tabard Inn at Southwark on their return.

Following a long list of works written earlier in his career, including Troilus and Criseyde, House of Fame, and Parliament of Fowls, the Canterbury Tales was Chaucer's magnum opus. He uses the tales and the descriptions of its characters to paint an ironic and critical portrait of English society at the time, and particularly of the Church. Structurally, the collection resembles The Decameron, which Chaucer may have read during his first diplomatic mission to Italy in 1372.

This audio collection contains a treasury of 100 classic books and includes info on the life and times of the author, the theme of the book, the characters, the story outline, a concise yet detailed abridgement of the story and a discussion of the values that make each book one of the great classical works of literature.

© ''IntelliQuest World's 100 Greatest Books'' 1995

Jason Tondro on the Canterbury Tales


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Miércoles 1 de octubre de 2014

I Wrote Her Name upon the Strand

El soneto 75 de los Amoretti de Spenser:





—oOo—


El pueblo de la otra orilla

El pueblo de la otra orilla


—oOo—



La juez Alaya en Vanity Fair


Aquí una entrevista en Vanity Fair:
alaya vanity fair


Y en Vanity Fea:

alaya vanity fea


No desmerece.



—oOo—


En la Universidad Aristóteles


—Allí estamos con nuestra bibliografía, en griego y en inglés, siguiendo la pista del Estagirita, en Salónica. Cierto que es más voluminosa, aunque no más espesa, que las obras de Aristóteles.





—oOo—


Microblog de octubre 2014
Fotos que se perdieron

31 oct 14, 21:11
JoseAngel: Radio Materialista: la democracia: http://m.ivoox.com/radio-materialista-episodio-20-especial-sobre-la-audios-mp3_rf_3678575_1.html
31 oct 14, 14:12
JoseAngel: Conferencia de Zaragoza Lingüística: Margarita Porroche, "La oralidad en las columnas de opinión" http://youtu.be/kWbDvspfxT8
30 oct 14, 19:44
JoseAngel: http://youtu.be/oPMv2eOKfkY
30 oct 14, 19:44
JoseAngel: Sobre la corrupción (minuto 46.46) "la tentación..." —"... vive arriba".
29 oct 14, 19:12
JoseAngel: Epistolary literature: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00775dh
29 oct 14, 13:17
JoseAngel: Entrevista con Albert Rivera: http://youtu.be/2gMnXb0GQpI
29 oct 14, 10:17
JoseAngel: Me citan en este artículo de Thélème: Revista Complutense de Estudios Franceses: http://dialnet.unirioja.es/servlet/articulo?codigo=3355777&orden=0&info=link
29 oct 14, 09:10
JoseAngel: Somos citados (NARRATOLOGY) en la tesis POSTMODERNIDAD DISCRETA, de la Universidad de Salamanca, sobre Darío Jaramillo: https://es.scribd.com/doc/244778258/DLEH-Adam-Faye-Posmodernidad-discreta-pdf
29 oct 14, 08:43
JoseAngel: La economía que se fue: http://www.cesarvidal.com/index.php/Podcast/escuchar-podcast/la_economia_que_fue_28_10_14
28 oct 14, 20:51
JoseAngel: Mariano, qué agonía la nuestra: http://tv.libertaddigital.com/videos/2014-10-28/federico-mariano-que-agonia-la-nuestra-con-tu-agonia-6047480.html
28 oct 14, 10:58
JoseAngel: Literary theory: Introduction and Greek origins: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/267417606_Literary_Theory_Introduction_and_Greek_Origins
27 oct 14, 18:03
JoseAngel: Débat sur la célébrité et la visibilité: http://youtu.be/izB2RB29FFc
27 oct 14, 17:40
JoseAngel: Life of John Milton: http://bcw-project.org/biography/john-milton
27 oct 14, 16:53
JoseAngel: Mi definición de narración, traducida al rumano: http://www.e-scoala.ro/ctitc/Narratology_an_Introduction22.html
27 oct 14, 16:39
JoseAngel: La sombra del sexador de nubes: http://lapaseata.wordpress.com/
27 oct 14, 13:48
JoseAngel: Los garabatos neandertales—¿primera escritura? ¿primer arte? ¿primera geometría? http://prensa.unizar.es/noticias/1410/141027_z0_vangu34.pdf
27 oct 14, 01:23
JoseAngel: Minuto 41: "We're still alive! Still standing!"
27 oct 14, 00:44
JoseAngel: Amy Winehouse live De la Semaine: http://youtu.be/Hlu7jPQSOuE
26 oct 14, 19:16
JoseAngel: 1984. Y era aquí. http://1984puntocat.tumblr.com/
26 oct 14, 17:57
JoseAngel: Pablemos citando a Judith Butler y a Beckett: http://youtu.be/YypsrIKl0zw
26 oct 14, 13:58
JoseAngel: Un capítulo mío sobre la narración en Samuel Beckett, en el Continental Philosophy eJournal: http://www.ssrn.com/link/Continental-Philosophy.html
26 oct 14, 13:45
JoseAngel: The Final Cut: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J7F53O58SBg
26 oct 14, 12:03
JoseAngel: Mas dice que quiere engañar al Estado: pero quien lo dice públicamente no quiere engañar, sino insultar y humillar, y mostrar el justo desprecio.
25 oct 14, 22:38
JoseAngel: Intensa, por cierto, Nuria Espert en 'La violación de Lucrecia' de Shakespeare: http://www.teatrodelasesquinas.com/nuria-espert-la-violacion-de-lucrecia/
25 oct 14, 12:15
JoseAngel: An audio on Marlowe (BBC In Our Time): http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p003k9d6
25 oct 14, 10:19
JoseAngel: Me enlazan la bibliografía en el Colegio de Bachilleres de México: http://www.cbachilleres.edu.mx/cb/comunidad/docentes/pdf/Reforma_curricular/Documentos/primersemestre2012/Ap_Artistica.pdf
24 oct 14, 23:05
JoseAngel: Las noticias de hoy con César Vidal: http://www.cesarvidal.com/index.php/Podcast/escuchar-podcast/las_noticias_del_dia_24_10_14
24 oct 14, 20:58
JoseAngel: Narración autodiegética: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2514510
24 oct 14, 19:10
JoseAngel: Cataluña: Un vergonzoso delirio colectivo, liderado por mangantes y cenutrios.
24 oct 14, 16:03
JoseAngel: Un orgasmo filológico: http://prensa.unizar.es/noticias/1410/141024_z0_VA-34.pdf
24 oct 14, 08:36
JoseAngel: 1980: http://www.libertaddigital.com/opinion/cristina-losada/1980-o-como-no-se-ha-contado-antes-el-terror-de-eta-73809/
22 oct 14, 20:05
JoseAngel: The Divine Right of Kings: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0080xph
22 oct 14, 18:49
JoseAngel: Imelda Marcos as the new Evita: http://youtu.be/KQoDjGGtyyg
22 oct 14, 14:20
JoseAngel: Will Self on ICT and literacy: http://www.theguardian.com/books/2014/oct/03/fate-literary-culture-sealed-internet-will-self
22 oct 14, 13:20
JoseAngel: The new degree reform in THE JOYS OF TEACHING LITERATURE: http://blogs.uab.cat/saramartinalegre/2014/10/19/the-new-ba-grado-reform-no-way-to-educate-anyone/
22 oct 14, 11:41
JoseAngel: Toleration in the 17th c. http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p004y288
22 oct 14, 00:44
JoseAngel: Semiosphere of Narratology: http://garciala.blogia.com/2014/102201--1057-1045-1052-1048-1054-1057-1060-1045-1056-1040-1053-1040-1056-1056-1040-1058.php
22 oct 14, 00:38
JoseAngel: Acebes, también imputado: http://esradio.libertaddigital.com/fonoteca/2014-10-21/tertulia-de-dieter-teresa-romero-supera-el-ebola-80045.html
21 oct 14, 16:11
JoseAngel: Melvyn Bragg on Milton: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p00548bg
21 oct 14, 12:47
JoseAngel: Hale, ya llevo 30 años de profesor universitario, y ni me había fijado... Acabo de solicitar el sexto quinquenio. En trienios aún soy más viejuno. Por suerte sexenios tengo pocos.
20 oct 14, 16:37
JoseAngel: A Short Biographical Dictionary of English Literature: http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/A_Short_Biographical_Dictionary_of_English_Literature
20 oct 14, 08:16
JoseAngel: El narrador autorial y las otras voces narrativas: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2510225
19 oct 14, 22:58
JoseAngel: Harto de ver la bolita de colores rodar, me encargo un disco duro de 1 Tb
19 oct 14, 18:37
JoseAngel: Estos chavales están demasiado maleados y virtualizados. Paseando por Santa Elena: "Esto de las excursiones es un rollo. Pero mira qué gráficos."
17 oct 14, 20:00
JoseAngel: Nos gobiernan necios, delincuentes y traidores. Qué nivel, España. Y aún podemos darnos con una piedra en los dientes, visto el nivel medio del planeta. Y así es la cosa.
17 oct 14, 10:19
JoseAngel: Kyd's 'Soliman and Perseda'—outside 'The Spanish Tragedy': http://www.britishtheatreguide.info/reviews/tragsoliman-rev
16 oct 14, 18:44
JoseAngel: In Search of Shakespeare: http://youtu.be/4h96ThdV_BM?list=PLIqV890M8SLSf1BHM_ObMO4hJtSF7IWp9
16 oct 14, 18:26
JoseAngel: The Partially Examined Life: Locke's Second Treatise on Govrenment: http://youtu.be/FZh3zIyObGw
16 oct 14, 13:43
JoseAngel: Me citan en el artículo "Stanley Fish" de la Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stanley_Fish#Secondary_criticism_about_Stanley_Fish
16 oct 14, 13:18
JoseAngel: Tengo READING THE MONSTER, 25 años despúes de escribirlo, en el top 1% en Academia: https://unizar.academia.edu/Jos%C3%A9AngelGarc%C3%ADaLanda?notification_code=8bN3vZuY
16 oct 14, 13:16
JoseAngel: La "narración" de los anillos del árbol: http://prensa.unizar.es/noticias/1410/141016_z0_Hu3.pdf
16 oct 14, 13:15
JoseAngel: UPyD toma una vía sospechosamente inquisitorial. Mal camino por ahí.
16 oct 14, 13:13
JoseAngel: Estamos en manos de ladrones de guante blanco, bien infiltrados entre la población. Los que pillan son sólo los más evidentes.
16 oct 14, 13:12
JoseAngel: ¿Profesor en inglés, nativo o español? http://prensa.unizar.es/noticias/1410/141016_z0_PE-06.pdf
16 oct 14, 12:53
JoseAngel: La mamarrachada del nacionalismo catalán: http://esradio.libertaddigital.com/fonoteca/2014-10-16/federico-a-las-6-escasa-respuesta-de-rajoy-a-artur-mas-79841.html
15 oct 14, 19:27
JoseAngel: Faustus and the Morality Play Tradition: http://youtu.be/BILq545a2WE
15 oct 14, 13:42
JoseAngel: Gone Girl, de David Fincher, es una adaptación poco lograda del libro de Gillian Flynn. Mucho mejor leer la novela y dejarlo allí.
15 oct 14, 12:58
JoseAngel: Ben Jonson, THE ALCHEMIST: http://youtu.be/6X4Q3Mm7zYk
14 oct 14, 16:42
JoseAngel: Thomas Paine's COMMON SENSE: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dxdqdax4VbQ
14 oct 14, 14:47
JoseAngel: Multiversos en Madrid: http://prensa.unizar.es/noticias/1410/141014_z0_elp41.pdf
14 oct 14, 14:44
JoseAngel: Modiano, un Nobel entre la memoria y la culpa: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ben_Jonson
14 oct 14, 12:53
JoseAngel: Who Were the Loyalists? http://youtu.be/W5j8TsHAzsA
14 oct 14, 09:08
JoseAngel: Hoy Ben Jonson: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ben_Jonson
14 oct 14, 07:54
JoseAngel: Garcialandia Is Out: https://paper.li/JoseAngelGLanda/1411163489
13 oct 14, 20:58
JoseAngel: Trece de octubre de dos mil catorce.
13 oct 14, 20:58
JoseAngel: Hoy vamos de visita al santuario del Ecce Homo de Borja.
13 oct 14, 20:49
JoseAngel: Marvels and Tales: Journal of Fairy Tale Studies: http://digitalcommons.wayne.edu/marvels/
13 oct 14, 13:34
JoseAngel: Ostras qué traducción se han cascao aquí: http://bddoc.csic.es:8080/detalles.html;jsessionid=2E44BF5CBBABA6F74B8FE8ACC27C6B74?id=365245&bd=ISOC&tabla=docu
13 oct 14, 12:17
JoseAngel: Me citan en esta tesis sobre las Amazonas: https://es.scribd.com/doc/135633121/
13 oct 14, 12:14
JoseAngel: Heaven: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p003k9lf
12 oct 14, 22:33
JoseAngel: Sin Complejos: La batalla de los símbolos: http://esradio.libertaddigital.com/fonoteca/2014-10-12/sin-complejos-completo-12102014-79704.html
12 oct 14, 15:48
Gameidiot: portal game easy baru
12 oct 14, 09:27
JoseAngel: Mark Solms on Consciousness: http://www.3sat.de/mediathek/index.php?mode=play&obj=45912
12 oct 14, 00:24
JoseAngel: Pescador y pájaro en La Mirada Indiscreta: http://lamiradaindiscretafotoblog.blogspot.com.es/2014/10/pescador-y-pajaro.html
11 oct 14, 22:18
JoseAngel: Que HORROR, la Malú.
11 oct 14, 22:09
JoseAngel: Poco fiesteros, no vamos al concierto de Malú: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KFvKS8mEK2k
11 oct 14, 20:52
JoseAngel: La insurrección de 1934: Cita con la historia (audio): http://www.ivoox.com/cita-historia-la-insurreccion-audios-mp3_rf_3573288_1.html
11 oct 14, 14:33
JoseAngel: Frank Kermode on Shakespeare's language: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p00546s8
11 oct 14, 00:26
JoseAngel: Las élites extractivas: http://www.cesarvidal.com/index.php/Podcast/escuchar-podcast/jeroboam_montoro
10 oct 14, 19:11
JoseAngel: The Scottish Enlightenment: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p00548ln
10 oct 14, 18:32
JoseAngel: Tengo varios artículos en el 5% de los más leídos en Academia—y uno en el 0,5% mi primero con más de 10.000 visitas: https://unizar.academia.edu/JoséAngelGarcíaLanda/
10 oct 14, 10:08
JoseAngel: Noticias de ayer de César Vidal: http://www.cesarvidal.com/index.php/Podcast/escuchar-podcast/noticias_del_9_de_octubre_de_2014
9 oct 14, 19:06
JoseAngel: Gregroy Cochran on The 10,000 Year Explosion: http://newbooksinhistory.com/2009/03/05/gregory-cochran-the-10000-year-explosion-how-civilization-accelerated-human-evolution/
9 oct 14, 15:23
JoseAngel: El status narrativo en la Trilogía: El status narrativo en la Trilogía: la narración en 'Molloy': http://ssrn.com/abstract=2506925
8 oct 14, 23:48
JoseAngel: My bibliography on ancient history: http://be.convdocs.org/docs/index-13416.html
8 oct 14, 23:15
JoseAngel: Entrando en la Trilogía: El narrador en 'Molloy': http://ssrn.com/abstract=2506925
8 oct 14, 20:46
JoseAngel: сегодня полнолуние, луна такая недосигаемая и такая яркая, словно огонь среди кромешной темноты
8 oct 14, 09:34
JoseAngel: The Metaphysical Poets: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00cbqhq
7 oct 14, 15:53
JoseAngel: The Trial of Charles I: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00kpzd6
7 oct 14, 15:07
JoseAngel: Jose Angel Garcia Landa Author Rank is 2,299 out of 263,755
7 oct 14, 15:07
JoseAngel: Nobel a los descubridores del GPS cerebral: http://prensa.unizar.es/noticias/1410/141007_z0_MUNDO%2044.pdf
7 oct 14, 08:39
JoseAngel: Federico a las 6: http://esradio.libertaddigital.com/es-la-manana-de-federico/federico-a-las-6.html
7 oct 14, 08:25
JoseAngel: Posición en Alianzo 211/28307 - 86 : http://www.alianzo.com/profile/vanity-fea
7 oct 14, 07:53
JoseAngel: Nos citan en esta tesis sobre Åsa Larsson: https://es.scribd.com/doc/241770329/Crime-With-Loss-of-Context-How-the-Translation-Changed-the-Implied-Reader-of-Asa-Larsson-s-the-Savage-Altar
6 oct 14, 23:18
JoseAngel: In Our Time (BBC): http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/articles/2Dw1c7rxs6DmyK0pMRwpMq1/in-our-time-archive
6 oct 14, 12:39
JoseAngel: Mapping the Universe: Quest for Dark Matter (Priya Natarajan): http://youtu.be/1laEP9uQUiM
5 oct 14, 20:57
JoseAngel: Nolwenn Leroy: http://youtu.be/_agnoIXNc3w?list=PLE17E0FBAB296B3DB
5 oct 14, 17:11
JoseAngel: Tengo 1200 seguidores en ACADEMIA: https://unizar.academia.edu/Jos%C3%A9AngelGarc%C3%ADaLanda/Followers
5 oct 14, 10:04
JoseAngel: Me citan en "Verbum et Ecclesia" http://ve.org.za/index.php/VE/article/view/889/1940
4 oct 14, 23:50
JoseAngel: Tendré que escribir sobre "La complejidad del tiempo humano en George Herbert Mead"
4 oct 14, 23:02
JoseAngel: я дочитал Гамлета, это книга одна из тех немногих, которые заинтересовывают меня не смотря на то, что идут по школьной программе
4 oct 14, 11:30
JoseAngel: Que ridículo público tan atroz, lo de Cataluña. Y encima no se dan cuenta...
4 oct 14, 11:29
JoseAngel: демон слэйер, сейчас посмотрим что это
3 oct 14, 18:36
JoseAngel: Introducción a "Samuel Beckett y la narración reflexiva": http://ssrn.com/abstract=2505110
3 oct 14, 18:07
JoseAngel: Perros con GPS. Bueno, pronto, todos con GPS y geolocalizados 24 h. al día, por nuestro bien. http://prensa.unizar.es/noticias/1410/141003_z0_He-03s.pdf
3 oct 14, 16:50
JoseAngel: Con/Texts of Persuasion: http://buch-info.org/t/Con-texts_of_persuasion
3 oct 14, 16:50
JoseAngel: Joaquín Casalduero, El teatro de Cervantes: http://www.march.es/conferencias/anteriores/voz.aspx?p1=21256&l=1
3 oct 14, 13:54
JoseAngel: A Lecture on Elizabethan Theatre: http://shakespearean.org.uk/elizthea1.htm
2 oct 14, 18:08
JoseAngel: The Colleen Bawn: http://garciala.blogia.com/2014/100201-the-colleen-bawn.php
2 oct 14, 17:54
JoseAngel: Hoy clase sobre Spenser (no Spencer): http://garciala.blogia.com/2009/010501-entierro-en-westminster.php
2 oct 14, 17:53
JoseAngel: Entierro en Westminster: http://garciala.blogia.com/2009/010501-entierro-en-westminster.php
2 oct 14, 17:42
JoseAngel: En 2012/13 Questia Media ha vendido 778 ejemplares electrónicos de NARRATOLOGY. No está mal, más de 15 años tras su publicación. De eso me tocan unas royalties que dan para un café.
2 oct 14, 12:26
JoseAngel: The Body— a body of papers: http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/JELJOUR_Results.cfm?form_name=journalBrowse&journal_id=2136279
2 oct 14, 00:08
JoseAngel: Bede: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bede
1 oct 14, 19:17
JoseAngel: Spark Notes introduction to the beginning of the Faerie Queene: http://youtu.be/R2opkd83bxs
1 oct 14, 19:06
JoseAngel: Spenser in Ireland - today: http://youtu.be/rbpzer-OuQo
1 oct 14, 12:47
JoseAngel: A lecture on Chaucer: http://youtu.be/hw3hg8oDkkY
1 oct 14, 12:41
JoseAngel: La óptica de la invisibilidad: http://www.cnet.com/news/invisibility-cloak-uses-lenses-to-bend-light/
1 oct 14, 12:37
JoseAngel: La rehabilitación de Filosofia, never is, always to be: http://prensa.unizar.es/noticias/1409/140930_z0_heraldo7.pdf
1 oct 14, 12:36
JoseAngel: Las novatadas, el imperio de los mediocres, y buena educación para el fascismo: http://prensa.unizar.es/noticias/1410/141001_z0_ABC47bis.pdf
1 oct 14, 12:34
JoseAngel: Falta colocación en Filología Inglesa en Barcelona: http://prensa.unizar.es/noticias/1410/141001_z0_VA-30.pdf
1 oct 14, 08:22
JoseAngel: If You Really Really Love Me, Read My Blog: Blog de notas de septiembre de 2014: http://www.unizar.es/departamentos/filologia_inglesa/garciala/z14-9.html
1 oct 14, 08:20
JoseAngel: Rajoy opone los "cambios en la constitución" a las "políticas que afectan a las personas". Eso da la medida de la importancia que le da a la constitución. Una irrelevancia, un tecnicismo.
1 oct 14, 08:18
JoseAngel: En una cosa tiene razón Mariano: El tarado PSOE aún no ha dicho qué quiere cambiar en la Constitución, sólo que quiere cambiarla pero no sabe cómo.
1 oct 14, 00:51
JoseAngel: Cataluña aún sigue ahí al este y no despega: http://esradio.libertaddigital.com/fonoteca/2014-09-30/editorial-de-luis-herrero-clamor-en-cataluna-contra-la-suspension-del-9-n-79268.html





Microblog de septiembre 2014





Edmund Spenser: A Life





'Another Game in Vew': The Representation of the Poet in The Faerie Queene






—oOo—